gelatin


gelatin
/jel"euh tn/, n.
1. a nearly transparent, faintly yellow, odorless, and almost tasteless glutinous substance obtained by boiling in water the ligaments, bones, skin, etc., of animals, and forming the basis of jellies, glues, and the like.
2. any of various similar substances, as vegetable gelatin.
3. a preparation or product in which such an animal or vegetable substance is the essential constituent.
4. an edible jelly made of this substance.
5. Also called gelatin slide. Theat. a thin sheet made of translucent gelatin colored with an aniline dye, placed over stage lights, and used as a color medium in obtaining lighting effects.
Also, gelatine.
[1790-1800; < F gélatine < ML gelatina, equiv. to L gelat(us) frozen, thickened, ptp. of gelare (gel- freeze + -atus -ATE1) + -ina -IN2]

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Animal protein substance having gel-forming properties, used primarily in food products.

Derived from collagen, it is extracted by boiling animal skin and bones. It is commonly produced as granules or as a mix with added sugars, flavours, and colours. Immersed in a liquid, gelatin takes up moisture and swells, causing the mixture to solidify. It is used to make such foods as molded desserts, jellied meats, soups, candies, and aspics and to stabilize such emulsion and foam food products as ice cream and marshmallows. It is nutritionally an incomplete protein. It is also used in various pharmaceutical products.

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▪ animal protein
      animal protein substance having gel-forming properties, used primarily in food products and home cookery, also having various industrial uses. Derived from collagen, a protein found in animal skin and bone, it is extracted by boiling animal hides, skins, bones, and tissue after alkali or acid pretreatment. An easily digested, pure protein food, it is nutritionally an incomplete protein, deficient in certain amino acids. Unflavoured, granulated gelatin, almost tasteless and odourless, ranges from faint yellow to amber in colour. Gelatin is also available as a finely ground mix with added sugar, flavouring, acids, and colouring. When stored in dry form, at room temperature, and in an airtight container, it remains stable for long periods.

      Immersed in a liquid, gelatin takes up moisture and swells. When the liquid is warmed, the swollen particles melt, forming a sol (fluid colloidal system) with the liquid that increases in viscosity and solidifies to form a gel as it cools. The gel state is reversible to a sol state at higher temperatures, and the sol can be changed back to a gel by cooling. Both setting time and tenderness are affected by protein and sugar concentration and by temperature. Gelatin may be whipped to form a foam and acts as an emulsifier and stabilizer. It is used to make such gel foods as jellied meats, soups, and candies, aspics, and molded desserts and to stabilize such emulsion and foam food products as ice cream, marshmallows, and mixtures of oils or fats with water. Fruit jellies resemble gelatin products but achieve solidification as a result of a natural vegetable substance called pectin.

      The food industry makes use of most of the gelatin produced. Gelatin is also used by the pharmaceutical industry for the manufacture of capsules, cosmetics, ointments, lozenges, and plasma products and by other industries.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Gelatin — (also gelatine, from French gélatine ) is a translucent, colourless, brittle, nearly tasteless solid substance, extracted from the collagen inside animals connective tissue. It has been commonly used as a gelling agent in food, pharmaceutical,… …   Wikipedia

  • Gelatin — Gel a*tin, Gelatine Gel a*tine, n. [F. g[ e]latine, fr. L. gelare to congeal. See {Geal}.] (Chem.) Animal jelly; glutinous material obtained from animal tissues by prolonged boiling. Specifically (Physiol. Chem.), a nitrogeneous colloid, not… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Gelatin — Groupe d artistes originaires de Vienne, Autriche. Gelatin est composé de quatre membres (Ali Janka, Wolfgang Gantner, Florian Reither, Tobias Urban) auxquels peuvent se rajouter d autres personnes selon les besoins événementiels. Le terme… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • gelatin — [jel′ətēn, gel′ətinjel′ə tin] n. [Fr gélatine < It gelatina < gelata, a jelly < pp. of L gelare, to freeze < IE base * gel , to freeze > COOL, L gelu, frost] 1. the tasteless, odorless, brittle mixture of proteins extracted by… …   English World dictionary

  • gelatin — gelatin, gelatine Gelatin (pronounced jel ǝ tin) is the customary form in chemical use, and in AmE in all uses, but gelatine (pronounced jel ǝ teen) is common in BrE in contexts to do with the preparation of food …   Modern English usage

  • gelatin — see GELATINE (Cf. gelatine) …   Etymology dictionary

  • gelatin — (also gelatine) ► NOUN 1) a virtually colourless and tasteless water soluble protein prepared from collagen and used in food preparation, in photographic processing, and for making glue. 2) a high explosive consisting chiefly of a gel of… …   English terms dictionary

  • gelatin — also gelatine noun Etymology: French gélatine edible jelly, gelatin, from Italian gelatina, from gelato, past participle of gelare to freeze, from Latin more at cold Date: 1800 1. glutinous material obtained from animal tissues by boiling;… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • gelatin — A derived protein formed from the collagen of tissues by boiling in water; it swells up when put in cold water, but dissolves only in hot water; used as a hemostat, plasma substitute, and protein food adjunct in malnutri …   Medical dictionary

  • gelatin — gel•a•tin or gel•a•tine [[t]ˈdʒɛl ə tn[/t]] n. 1) coo a nearly transparent, glutinous substance, obtained by boiling the bones, ligaments, etc., of animals, and used in making jellies, glues, and the like 2) coo any of various similar substances …   From formal English to slang


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