fugitive


fugitive
fugitively, adv.fugitiveness, fugitivity, n.
/fyooh"ji tiv/, n.
1. a person who is fleeing, from prosecution, intolerable circumstances, etc.; a runaway: a fugitive from justice; a fugitive from a dictatorial regime.
adj.
2. having taken flight, or run away: a fugitive slave.
3. fleeting; transitory; elusive: fugitive thoughts that could not be formulated.
4. Fine Arts. changing color as a result of exposure to light and chemical substances present in the atmosphere, in other pigments, or in the medium.
5. dealing with subjects of passing interest, as writings; ephemeral: fugitive essays.
6. wandering, roving, or vagabond: a fugitive carnival.
[1350-1400; < L fugitivus fleeing, equiv. to fugit(us) (ptp. of fugere to flee) + -ivus -IVE; r. ME fugitif < OF]
Syn. 3. transient, passing, flitting, flying, brief, temporary. 5. momentary, evanescent, trivial, light. 6. straying, roaming.
Ant. 3, 4. permanent. 5. lasting.

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▪ American literary group
      any of a group of young poets and critics formed shortly after World War I at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., some of whom later became distinguished men of letters. The group, led by the poet and critic John Crowe Ransom (Ransom, John Crowe) (q.v.), devoted itself to the writing and discussion of poetry and published a bimonthly magazine, The Fugitive (1922–25), edited by poet Allen Tate (Tate, Allen) (q.v.). Other important members of the group were the poet, essayist, and critic Donald Davidson (Davidson, Donald) and the novelist and poet Robert Penn Warren. Outstanding selections from the magazine were collected in the Fugitive Anthology (1928).

      Acutely aware of their Southern heritage, the Fugitives advocated a form of literary regionalism, concentrating largely on the history and customs of the South in their work. Many of the Fugitives went on to become leaders in the Agrarian movement of the 1930s, which sought to resist the inroads of industrialism by a return to the agricultural economy of the Old South. Their views were published as a symposium in I'll Take My Stand (1930).

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Fugitive — Fu gi*tive, a. [OE. fugitif, F. fugitif, fr. L. fugitivus, fr. fugere to flee. See {Bow} to bend, and cf. {Feverfew}.] 1. Fleeing from pursuit, danger, restraint, etc., escaping, from service, duty etc.; as, a fugitive solder; a fugitive slave; a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fugitive — fu·gi·tive / fyü jə tiv/ n: a person who flees; esp: a person who flees one jurisdiction (as a state) for another in order to elude law enforcement personnel Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. fugitive …   Law dictionary

  • Fugitive — Fu gi*tive, n. 1. One who flees from pursuit, danger, restraint, service, duty, etc.; a deserter; as, a fugitive from justice. [1913 Webster] 2. Something hard to be caught or detained. [1913 Webster] Or Catch that airy fugitive called wit. Harte …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fugitive — late 14c. (adj. and noun), from O.Fr. fugitif, from L. fugitivus fleeing (but commonly used as a noun meaning runaway, fugitive slave, deserter ), from pp. stem of fugere run away, flee, from PIE root *bheug (1) to flee (Cf. Gk. pheugein to flee …   Etymology dictionary

  • fugitive — [adj] fleeing, transient avoiding, brief, criminal, elusive, ephemeral, errant, erratic, escaping, evading, evanescent, fleeting, flitting, flying*, fugacious, hot*, impermanent, lamster, momentary, moving, on the lam*, passing, planetary,… …   New thesaurus

  • fugitive — [fyo͞o′ji tiv] adj. [ME fugitif < OFr < L fugitivus < pp. of fugere, to flee < IE base * bheug , to flee > Gr phygē, flight] 1. fleeing, apt to flee, or having fled, as from danger, justice, etc. 2. a) passing quickly away;… …   English World dictionary

  • fugitive — adj evanescent, transitory, *transient, fleeting, passing, ephemeral, momentary, short lived …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • fugitive — ► NOUN ▪ a person who has escaped from captivity or is in hiding. ► ADJECTIVE ▪ quick to disappear; fleeting. ORIGIN Latin fugitivus, from fugere flee …   English terms dictionary

  • Fugitive — For other uses, see The Fugitive (disambiguation). Fugitives are often profiled in the media in order to be apprehended, such as in the TV show America s Most Wanted. A fugitive (or runaway) is a person who is fleeing from custody, whether it be… …   Wikipedia

  • fugitive — n. 1) to track down a fugitive 2) a fugitive from (a fugitive from justice) * * * [ fjuːdʒɪtɪv] to track down a fugitive a fugitive from (a fugitive from justice) …   Combinatory dictionary


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