fret


fret
fret1
fretter, n.
/fret/, v., fretted, fretting, n.
v.i.
1. to feel or express worry, annoyance, discontent, or the like: Fretting about the lost ring isn't going to help.
2. to cause corrosion; gnaw into something: acids that fret at the strongest metals.
3. to make a way by gnawing, corrosion, wearing away, etc.: The river frets at its banks until a new channel is formed.
4. to become eaten, worn, or corroded (often fol. by away): Limestone slowly frets away under pounding by the wind and rain.
5. to move in agitation or commotion, as water: water fretting over the stones of a brook.
v.t.
6. to torment; irritate, annoy, or vex: You mustn't fret yourself about that.
7. to wear away or consume by gnawing, friction, rust, corrosives, etc.: the ocean fretting its shores.
8. to form or make by wearing away a substance: The river had fretted an underground passage.
9. to agitate (water): Strong winds were fretting the channel.
n.
10. an irritated state of mind; annoyance; vexation.
11. erosion; corrosion; gnawing.
12. a worn or eroded place.
[bef. 900; ME freten, OE fretan to eat up, consume; c. OS fretan, Goth fraitan, OHG frezzan (G fressen)]
Syn. 1. fume, rage. 6. worry, harass, goad, tease. 7. erode, gnaw, corrode, abrade, grind, rub, rust. 10. harassment, agitation, worry.
fret2
fretless, adj.
/fret/, n., v., fretted, fretting.
n.
1. an interlaced, angular design; fretwork.
2. an angular design of bands within a border.
3. Heraldry. a charge composed of two diagonal strips interlacing with and crossing at the center of a mascle.
4. a piece of decoratively pierced work placed in a clock case to deaden the sound of the mechanism.
v.t.
5. to ornament with a fret or fretwork.
[1350-1400; ME frette < ?; cf. MF frete trellis-work, OE fretwian, var. of FRAETWIAN to adorn]
fret3
fretless, adj.
/fret/, n., v., fretted, fretting.
n.
1. any of the ridges of wood, metal, or string, set across the fingerboard of a guitar, lute, or similar instrument, which help the fingers to stop the strings at the correct points.
v.t.
2. to provide with frets.
[1490-1500; orig. uncert.]

* * *

▪ art and architecture
also called  key pattern 
 in decorative art and architecture, any one of several types of running or repeated ornament, consisting of lengths of straight lines or narrow bands, usually connected and at right angles to each other in T, L, or square-cornered G shapes, so arranged that the spaces between the lines or bands are approximately equal to the width of the bands. Occasionally the system is arranged so that the lines intersect or interlace, as in the common swastika fret. Because the fret is one of the simplest and most natural of decorative forms, it is one of the most widely spread, found from early times in most art forms and on all continents. Thus, it was a favourite decoration, during and after the 4th dynasty, for the ceilings of tombs in Egypt, where in later examples it was combined with rosettes, scarabs, and the lotus into patterns of great richness.

      In America the design has been found in early Peruvian textiles, on extant sculpture and architecture of the Mayan and Aztec cultures in Mesoamerica, and as a universal pottery decoration among American Indians. Highly developed by both the Chinese and the Japanese for textiles as well as for architectural ornament, the fret occurs not only as a band but also as a complicated allover pattern, sometimes with acute and obtuse angles instead of the more usual right angles. Its most important development, however, came at the hands of the Greeks (hence the common name Greek fret or Greek key), who used it for pottery and for painted decoration of architectural members, such as the abaci of capitals, where it was later carved.

      Like so many Greek motifs, the fret was widely used by the Romans, particularly in Syria (e.g., the propylaea at Damascus and the great temple at Baalbek), and it occurs in Byzantine and Romanesque work.

      Fretwork, either painted or carved, is the most often used of any small-scale repeated ornament in which geometrical forms occur.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • fret — fret …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • fret — [ frɛ(t) ] n. m. • XIIIe; néerl. vrecht 1 ♦ Prix du transport des marchandises par mer, et par ext. par air ou par route. ♢ Prix de location d un navire. ⇒ nolis. 2 ♦ Loc. À FRET : en louant le bâtiment servant au transport des marchandises.… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Fret — (fr[e^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Fretted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Fretting}.] [OE. freten to eat, consume; AS. fretan, for foretan; pref. for + etan to eat; akin to D. vreten, OHG. frezzan, G. fressen, Sw. fr[ a]ta, Goth. fra itan. See {For}, and {Eat} …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fret — Fret, n. 1. Ornamental work in relief, as carving or embossing. See {Fretwork}. [1913 Webster] 2. (Arch.) An ornament consisting of small fillets or slats intersecting each other or bent at right angles, as in classical designs, or at oblique… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fret — fret1 [fret] vt. fretted, fretting [ME freten < OE fretan, to devour, akin to Ger fressen, Goth fra itan < Gmc prefix * fra (OE for : see FOR ) + * itan, to eat (OE etan: see EAT)] 1. to eat away; gnaw 2. to wear away by gnawing, rubbing,… …   English World dictionary

  • Fret — Fret, n. 1. The agitation of the surface of a fluid by fermentation or other cause; a rippling on the surface of water. Addison. [1913 Webster] 2. Agitation of mind marked by complaint and impatience; disturbance of temper; irritation; as, he… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fret — Ⅰ. fret [1] ► VERB (fretted, fretting) 1) be constantly or visibly anxious. 2) gradually wear away by rubbing or gnawing. ► NOUN chiefly Brit. ▪ a state of anxiety. ORIGIN Old …   English terms dictionary

  • Fret — Fret, v. t. [OE. fretten to adorn, AS. fr[ae]twan, fr[ae]twian; akin to OS. fratah[=o]n, cf. Goth. us fratwjan to make wise, also AS. fr[ae]twe ornaments, OS. fratah[=i] adornment.] To ornament with raised work; to variegate; to diversify. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fret — Fret, n. [F. frette a saltire, also a hoop, ferrule, prob. a dim. of L. ferrum iron. For sense 2, cf. also E. fret to rub.] 1. (Her.) A saltire interlaced with a mascle. [1913 Webster] 2. (Mus.) A short piece of wire, or other material fixed… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fret — kann mehrere Bedeutungen haben. der Geschäftsbereich des Güterbahnverkehrs der französischen Staatsbahn SNCF Bund, ein Element von Saiteninstrumenten, wird auch fret genannt. dazu: Frets on Fire fretless Förster Resonanzenergietransfer oder auch… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • fret — [v1] worry, be annoyed affront, agonize, anguish, bleed, bother, brood, carp, carry a heavy load*, chafe, chagrin, distress oneself, eat one’s heart out*, fume, fuss, get into a dither*, grieve, lose sleep over*, mope*, pother*, stew, sweat it… …   New thesaurus


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.