finance


finance
financeable adj.
/fi nans", fuy"nans/, n., v., financed, financing.
n.
1. the management of revenues; the conduct or transaction of money matters generally, esp. those affecting the public, as in the fields of banking and investment.
2. finances, the monetary resources, as of a government, company, organization, or individual; revenue.
v.t.
3. to supply with money or capital; obtain money or credit for.
v.i.
4. to raise money or capital needed for financial operations.
[1350-1400; ME finaunce < AF, MF finance, equiv. to fin(er) to end, settle, pay (see FINE2) + -ance -ANCE]

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I
Process of raising funds or capital for any kind of expenditure.

Consumers, business firms, and governments often do not have the funds they need to make purchases or conduct their operations, while savers and investors have funds that could earn interest or dividends if put to productive use. Finance is the process of channeling funds from savers to users in the form of credit, loans, or invested capital through agencies including commercial banks, savings and loan associations, and such nonbank organizations as credit unions and investment companies. Finance can be divided into three broad areas: business finance, personal finance, and public finance. All three involve generating budgets and managing funds for the optimum results. See also corporate finance.
II
(as used in expressions)

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      the process of raising funds or capital for any kind of expenditure. Consumers, business firms, and governments often do not have the funds available to make expenditures, pay their debts, or complete other transactions and must borrow or sell equity to obtain the money they need to conduct their operations. Savers and investors, on the other hand, accumulate funds which could earn interest or dividends if put to productive use. These savings (saving) may accumulate in the form of savings deposits, savings and loan shares, or pension and insurance claims; when loaned out at interest or invested in equity shares, they provide a source of investment funds. Finance is the process of channeling these funds in the form of credit, loans, or invested capital to those economic entities that most need them or can put them to the most productive use. The institutions that channel funds from savers to users are called financial intermediaries. They include commercial banks, savings banks, savings and loan associations, and such nonbank institutions as credit unions, insurance companies, pension funds, investment companies, and finance companies.

      Three broad areas in finance have developed specialized institutions, procedures, standards, and goals: business finance, personal finance, and public finance. In developed nations, an elaborate structure of financial markets and institutions exists to serve the needs of these areas jointly and separately.

      Business finance is a form of applied economics that uses the quantitative data provided by accounting, the tools of statistics, and economic theory in an effort to optimize the goals of a corporation or other business entity. The basic financial decisions involved include an estimate of future asset requirements and the optimum combination of funds needed to obtain those assets. Business financing makes use of short-term credit in the form of trade credit, bank loans, and commercial paper. Long-term funds are obtained by the sale of securities (stocks and bonds) to a variety of financial institutions and individuals through the operations of national and international capital markets. See business finance.

      Personal finance deals primarily with family budgets, the investment of personal savings, and the use of consumer credit. Individuals typically obtain mortgages from commercial banks and savings and loan associations to purchase their homes, while financing for the purchase of consumer durable goods (automobiles, appliances) can be obtained from banks and finance companies. Charge accounts and credit cards are other important means by which banks and businesses extend short-term credit to consumers. If individuals need to consolidate their debts or borrow cash in an emergency, small cash loans can be obtained at banks, credit unions, or finance companies.

      The level and importance of public, or government, finance has increased sharply in Western countries since the Great Depression of the 1930s. As a result, taxation, public expenditures, and the nature of the public debt now typically exert a much greater effect on a nation's economy than previously. Governments finance their expenditures through a number of different methods, by far the most important of which is taxes. Government budgets seldom balance, however, and in order to finance their deficits governments must borrow, which in turn creates public debt. Most public debt consists of marketable securities issued by a government, which must make specified payments at designated times to the holders of its securities. See public debt.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • finance — [ finɑ̃s ] n. f. • 1283 « paiement, rançon », puis « argent »; du v. finer « payer », altér. de finir « mener à fin, venir à bout » 1 ♦ Vx Ressources pécuniaires. ⇒ argent, ressource. Mod. Loc. MOYENNANT FINANCE : en échange d argent. Au plur.,… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • finance — FINANCE. s. f. Argent comptant. En ce sens il n a guere d usage que dans le style familier & en plaisanterie. Il est un peu court de finance. il n a pas grande finance. Finance, La somme d argent qui se paye aux coffres du Roy, soit pour la levée …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • finance — fi·nance 1 n 1 pl: money or other liquid resources of a government, business, group, or individual 2: the system that includes the circulation of money, the granting of credit, the making of investments, and the provision of banking facilities 3 …   Law dictionary

  • Finance — Fi*nance , n. [F., fr. LL. financia payment of money, money, fr. finare to pay a fine or subsidy (cf. OF. finer to finish, pay), fr. L. finis end. See {Fine}, n., {Finish}.] 1. The income of a ruler or of a state; revenue; public money; sometimes …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Finance — Fi*nance , v. t. & i. [imp. & p. p. {Financed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Financing}.] To conduct the finances of; to provide for, and manage, the capital for; to financier. Securing foreign capital to finance multitudinous undertakings. B. H. Chamberlain …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Finance — Nom porté dans les Vosges et le Haut Rhin. C est un toponyme qui désigne une limite de territoire. Un hameau de l Yonne s appelle la Finance (commune de Piffonds). M.T. Morlet signale un lieu dit à Escles (88) …   Noms de famille

  • finance — [n] economic affairs accounts, banking, business, commerce, economics, financial affairs, investment, money, money management; concepts 360,770 finance [v] offer loan money; set up in business back, bank, bankroll, capitalize, endow, float*, fund …   New thesaurus

  • finance — [fī′nans΄, fə nans′] n. [ME finaunce, a fine, forfeit < OFr finance, wealth, revenue < finer, to end, settle accounts, pay ransom < fin: see FINE2] 1. [pl.] the money resources, income, etc. of a nation, organization, or person 2. the… …   English World dictionary

  • financé — financé, ée (fi nan sé, sée) part. passé. Payé au roi pour l acquisition d une charge. Une somme financée …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • financé — Financé, [financ]ée. part …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • finance — ► NOUN 1) the management of large amounts of money, especially by governments or large companies. 2) monetary support for an enterprise. 3) (finances) monetary resources. ► VERB ▪ provide funding for. ORIGIN Old French, from finer settle a debt …   English terms dictionary


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