fig


fig
fig1
/fig/, n.
1. any tree or shrub belonging to the genus Ficus, of the mulberry family, esp. a small tree, F. carica, native to southwestern Asia, bearing a turbinate or pear-shaped fruit that is eaten fresh, preserved, or dried.
2. the fruit of such a tree or shrub, or of any related species.
3. any of various plants having a fruit somewhat resembling this.
4. a contemptibly trifling or worthless amount; the least bit: His help wasn't worth a fig.
5. a gesture of contempt.
[1175-1225; ME fige < OF < OPr figa < VL *fica, for L ficus]
fig2
/fig/, n.
1. dress or array: to appear at a party in full fig.
2. condition: to feel in fine fig.
[1685-95; earlier feague to liven, whip up < G fegen to furbish, sweep, clean; akin to FAIR1]

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Any plant of the genus Ficus, in the mulberry family, especially Ficus carica, the common fig.

Yielding the well-known figs of commerce, F. carica is native to an area from Asiatic Turkey to northern India, but natural seedlings grow in most Mediterranean countries, where figs are used extensively, both fresh and dried. It is a bush or small tree with broad, rough, deciduous leaves (see deciduous tree). Hundreds of different varieties are grown in various parts of the world. The fig was one of the first fruit trees to come under cultivation. Its fruit contains significant amounts of calcium, potassium, phosphorus, and iron.

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plant
      plant of the genus Ficus, of the mulberry family (Moraceae), especially Ficus carica, the common fig. Ficus carica, which yields the well-known figs of commerce, is indigenous to an area extending from Asiatic Turkey to northern India, but natural seedlings grow in most Mediterranean countries. It is a bush or small tree, from 1 m (3 feet) to 10 to 12 m (33 to 39 feet) high, with broad, rough, deciduous leaves that are deeply lobed or sometimes nearly entire.

      Fig fruits are borne singly or in pairs above the scars of fallen leaves or in axils of leaves of the present season. Flowers are staminate (male) or pistillate (female). Long-styled female flowers are characteristic of the fruits of most garden and orchard fig trees. Short-styled female flowers are found only in fruits of the caprifig tree and are adapted to the egg-laying habits of the fig wasp, or Blastophaga. Male flowers, which produce pollen, are found in caprifigs, usually near the apex.

      In addition to the caprifig, there are three other horticultural types of fig: Smyrna, White San Pedro, and Common. Smyrna-type figs develop only when fertile seeds are present, and these seeds account for the generally excellent quality and nutty flavour of the fruit. Figs of the White San Pedro type combine the characteristics of both the Smyrna and the Common type on one tree. First-crop figs develop without flower pollination, while second-crop figs in axils of leaves require it. Common figs such as the Dottato, Fraga, and Brown Turkey do not require pollination of flowers of either crop, the seeds in the mature fruit usually being hollow. The flowers of such figs were once regarded as incapable of fecundation and were therefore designated as mule flowers; but it has been proved that all common figs can produce fertile seeds if the flowers are pollinated.

      The varieties of figs grown in various parts of the world run into the hundreds. Their nomenclature is very much confused, since the same fig is often grown in neighbouring provinces under entirely different names. When a fig is introduced into other countries, a new name is commonly coined. Thus Lob Injir of Smyrna became Calimyrna in California, and Dottato of Italy became Kadota. The Italian San Piero is known in England as Negro Largo, in France as Aubique Noire, and in California as San Pedro Black, Brown Turkey, or Black Spanish.

      The fig was one of the earliest fruit trees cultivated by primitive peoples, and its cultivation spread in remote ages over all the districts around the Aegean Sea and throughout the Levant. The Greeks are said to have received it from Caria (hence the specific name); Attic figs became celebrated in the East, and special laws were made to regulate their exportation. The fig was one of the principal articles of sustenance among the Greeks; the Spartans especially used it at their public tables. Pliny the Elder enumerates many varieties and describes those of home growth as furnishing a large portion of the food of slaves. In Latin myth the fig was held sacred to Bacchus and employed in religious ceremonies; the fig tree that overshadowed the twin founders of Rome in the wolf 's cave was an emblem of the future prosperity of the race.

      In Mediterranean countries the fig is so widely used, both fresh and dried, that it is called “the poor man's food.” The fruit contains significant amounts of calcium, potassium, phosphorus, and iron.

      Fig trees are propagated from cuttings of dormant wood taken in February in the Northern Hemisphere and planted in nursery rows. These grow in one season to a height of 1 m (3 feet) and are ready to transplant at the end of the growing season. The trees thrive in a wide range of soil types and in most Mediterranean countries receive water only from the natural rainfall. Some varieties produce only one crop, in summer or fall. Some bear two crops, the first maturing in June or July on wood of the previous growth and the second ripening in summer or fall in the axils of the leaves of the same season. In cool climates such as those of England and central France, most varieties mature only the first crop. Pot culture of figs in greenhouses has long been practiced in England and other countries.

      In most districts, figs are gathered when they fall and placed on trays for drying. Turning and manipulating during the drying process improves the texture and quality of the product. In the Old World, figs are grown commercially in Italy, Turkey, Algeria, Greece, Portugal, and Spain.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Fig — (f[i^]g), n. [F. figue the fruit of the tree, Pr. figa, fr. L. ficus fig tree, fig. Cf. {Fico}.] 1. (Bot.) A small fruit tree ({Ficus Carica}) with large leaves, known from the remotest antiquity. It was probably native from Syria westward to the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • FIG — (Heb. תְּאֵנָה, te enah), one of the seven species with which Ereẓ Israel was blessed (Deut. 8:8). It is mentioned in the Bible 16 times together with the vine as the most important of the country s fruit. The saying every man under his vine and… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • fig — (n.) early 13c., from O.Fr. figue (12c.), from O.Prov. figa, from V.L. *fica, from L. ficus fig tree, fig, from a pre I.E. Mediterranean language, possibly Semitic (Cf. Phoenician pagh half ripe fig ). A reborrowing of a word that had been taken… …   Etymology dictionary

  • fig — fig1 [fig] n. [ME fige < OFr < VL * fica, for L ficus, fig tree, fig] 1. the hollow, pear shaped false fruit (syconium) of the fig tree, with sweet, pulpy flesh containing numerous tiny, seedlike true fruits (achenes) 2. any of a genus… …   English World dictionary

  • fig — [ fıg ] noun count a soft fruit with purple or green skin and a lot of small seeds inside. It grows on a fig tree. not give a fig about/for something BRITISH INFORMAL OLD FASHIONED to not care at all about something not worth a fig worth nothing …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • fig — Ⅰ. fig [1] ► NOUN ▪ a soft pear shaped fruit with sweet dark flesh and many small seeds. ● not give (or care) a fig Cf. ↑not give a fig ORIGIN Old French figue from Latin ficus. Ⅱ …   English terms dictionary

  • Fig — Fig, v. t. [See {Fico}, {Fig}, n.] 1. To insult with a fico, or contemptuous motion. See {Fico}. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] When Pistol lies, do this, and fig me like The bragging Spaniard. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To put into the head of, as something …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fig — [fıg] n [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: figue, from Latin ficus] 1.) a soft sweet fruit with a lot of small seeds, often eaten dried, or the tree on which this fruit grows 2.) not give a fig/not care a fig (about/for sth/sb) old fashioned …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • fig — [fıg] n [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: figue, from Latin ficus] 1.) a soft sweet fruit with a lot of small seeds, often eaten dried, or the tree on which this fruit grows 2.) not give a fig/not care a fig (about/for sth/sb) old fashioned …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Fig — Fig, n. Figure; dress; array. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] Were they all in full fig, the females with feathers on their heads, the males with chapeaux bras? Prof. Wilson. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fig. — fig. UK US noun [C] ► WRITTEN ABBREVIATION for FIGURE(Cf. ↑figure) noun: »The model used in his reflection (see fig. 1, p. 40) captures the act of composing as many of us recognize it …   Financial and business terms


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