fiddler crab


fiddler crab
any small, burrowing crab of the genus Uca, characterized by one greatly enlarged claw in the male.
[1700-10, Amer.]

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Any of about 65 species of decapods (genus Uca) whose males hold one claw, always much larger than the other, somewhat like a violin.

Both claws of the female are relatively small. Fiddler crabs often live in large numbers on beaches in temperate to tropical regions of the world. They inhabit water-covered burrows up to about 1 ft (30 cm) deep and feed on algae and other organic matter. Common North American species (e.g., marsh fiddler, china-back fiddler) live all along the U.S. Atlantic coast. Brightly coloured, they range in body size from about 1 to 1.2 in. (2.5 to 3 cm).

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also called  calling crab 

      any of the approximately 65 species of the genus Uca (order Decapoda of the subphylum Crustacea). They are named “fiddler” because the male holds one claw, always much larger than the other, somewhat like a violin. Both claws in the female are relatively small. In males, claws can be regenerated if they are lost.

      Fiddler crabs often occur in large numbers on beaches in temperate to tropical regions of the world. They live in water-covered burrows up to 30 cm (about 1 foot) deep and feed on algae and other organic matter. Common North American species include the marsh fiddler crab (Uca pugnax), the china-back fiddler (U. pugilator), and the red-jointed fiddler (U. minax). These species, which range in body size from about 2.5 to 3 cm (1 to 1.2 inches), occur all along the Atlantic coast of the United States. The males of all species are more brightly coloured than the females. Colours range from coral red, bright green, and yellow to light blue.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Fiddler crab — Fiddler Fid dler, n. [AS. fi[eth]elere.] 1. One who plays on a fiddle or violin. [1913 Webster] 2. (Zo[ o]l.) A burrowing crab of the genus {Gelasimus}, of many species. The male has one claw very much enlarged, and often holds it in a position… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fiddler crab — Fiddler Fid dler, n. [AS. fi[eth]elere.] 1. One who plays on a fiddle or violin. [1913 Webster] 2. (Zo[ o]l.) A burrowing crab of the genus {Gelasimus}, of many species. The male has one claw very much enlarged, and often holds it in a position… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fiddler crab — ☆ fiddler crab n. a small, burrowing crab (genus Uca), the male of which has one claw much larger than the other …   English World dictionary

  • Fiddler crab — Taxobox name = fiddler crab image width = 250px image caption = Uca pugnax regnum = Animalia phylum = Arthropoda subphylum = Crustacea classis = Malacostraca ordo = Decapoda infraordo = Brachyura familia = Ocypodidae genus = Uca genus authority …   Wikipedia

  • fiddler crab — fid′dler crab n. ivt any small burrowing crab of the genus Uca, characterized by one greatly enlarged claw in the male • Etymology: 1700–10, amer …   From formal English to slang

  • fiddler crab — noun burrowing crab of American coastal regions having one claw much enlarged in the male • Hypernyms: ↑crab • Member Holonyms: ↑Uca, ↑genus Uca …   Useful english dictionary

  • fiddler crab — noun a genus of crab in which the male has one hugely enlarged claw (genus Uca) …   Wiktionary

  • fiddler crab — noun a small amphibious crab, the males of which have one greatly enlarged claw. [Genus Uca.] …   English new terms dictionary

  • fiddler crab — /ˈfɪdlə kræb/ (say fidluh krab) noun any small Indo Pacific burrowing crab of the genus Uca, the male of which has one greatly enlarged claw …   Australian English dictionary

  • fiddler crab — noun Date: 1843 any of a genus (Uca) of burrowing crabs in which the male has one claw that is greatly enlarged …   New Collegiate Dictionary


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