fetch


fetch
fetch1
fetcher, n.
/fech/, v.t.
1. to go and bring back; return with; get: to go up a hill to fetch a pail of water.
2. to cause to come; bring: to fetch a doctor.
3. to sell for or bring (a price, financial return, etc.): The horse fetched $50 more than it cost.
4. Informal. to charm; captivate: Her beauty fetched the coldest hearts.
5. to take (a breath).
6. to utter (a sigh, groan, etc.).
7. to deal or deliver (a stroke, blow, etc.).
8. to perform or execute (a movement, step, leap, etc.).
9. Chiefly Naut. and Brit. Dial. to reach; arrive at: to fetch port.
10. Hunting. (of a dog) to retrieve (game).
v.i.
11. to go and bring things.
12. Chiefly Naut. to move or maneuver.
13. Hunting. to retrieve game (often used as a command to a dog).
14. to go by an indirect route; circle (often fol. by around or about): We fetched around through the outer suburbs.
15. fetch about, Naut. (of a sailing vessel) to come onto a new tack.
16. fetch and carry, to perform menial tasks.
17. fetch up,
a. Informal. to arrive or stop.
b. Older Use. to raise (children); bring up: She had to fetch up her younger sisters.
c. Naut. (of a vessel) to come to a halt, as by lowering an anchor or running aground; bring up.
n.
18. the act of fetching.
19. the distance of fetching: a long fetch.
20. Oceanog.
a. an area where ocean waves are being generated by the wind.
b. the length of such an area.
21. the reach or stretch of a thing.
22. a trick; dodge.
[bef. 1000; ME fecchen, OE fecc(e)an, var. of fetian to fetch (cf. ME feten, fetten, Brit. dial. fet; akin to OE -fat in sithfat journey, G fassen to grasp)]
Syn. 1. See bring.
fetch2
/fech/, n.
wraith (def. 1).
[1780-90; perh. short for fetch-life one sent to fetch the soul of a dying person]

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      area of ocean or lake surface over which the wind blows in an essentially constant direction, thus generating waves. The term also is used as a synonym for fetch length, which is the horizontal distance over which wave-generating winds blow. In an enclosed body of water, fetch is also defined as the distance between the points of minimum and maximum water-surface elevation. This line generally coincides with the longest axis in the general wind direction. Fetch is an important factor in the development of wind waves, which increase in height with increasing fetch up to a maximum of 1,600 km (1,000 miles). Wave heights do not increase with increasing fetch beyond this distance.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

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  • Fetch — (f[e^]ch; 224), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Fetched} 2; p. pr. & vb. n.. {Fetching}.] [OE. fecchen, AS. feccan, perh. the same word as fetian; or cf. facian to wish to get, OFries. faka to prepare. [root]77. Cf. {Fet}, v. t.] 1. To bear toward the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fetch — [ fetʃ ] verb transitive ** 1. ) to be sold for a particular amount of money, especially at an AUCTION (=sale where goods are sold to the person offering the most money): The painting is expected to fetch up to $220,000. 2. ) OLD FASHIONED to go… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • Fetch — may refer to: * Fetch (geography), the length of water over which a given wind has blown * Fetch (game), a game played between a human and a pet in which the human throws an object for the pet to catch and/or retrieve * Fetch (FTP client), a… …   Wikipedia

  • fetch — ● fetch, fetches nom masculin (anglais fetch) En hydrologie, synonyme de course. ● fetch, fetches (synonymes) nom masculin (anglais fetch) Synonymes : course fetch …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • fetch — fetch, v. i. To bring one s self; to make headway; to veer; as, to fetch about; to fetch to windward. Totten. [1913 Webster] {To fetch away} (Naut.), to break loose; to roll or slide to leeward. {To fetch and carry}, to serve obsequiously, like a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fetch — Fetch, n. 1. A stratagem by which a thing is indirectly brought to pass, or by which one thing seems intended and another is done; a trick; an artifice. [1913 Webster] Every little fetch of wit and criticism. South. [1913 Webster] 2. The… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fetch — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Un fetch es un doble sobrenatural, aparición o fantasma de una persona viva en el folklore irlandés. Es en gran parte semejante al doppelganger. Francis Grose escribió en su Provincial Glossary (1787) que el término… …   Wikipedia Español

  • fetch — ► VERB 1) go for and bring back. 2) cause to come to a place. 3) achieve (a particular price) when sold. 4) (fetch up) informal arrive or come to rest. 5) informal inflict (a blow) on. 6) archaic bring forth (blood or tears) …   English terms dictionary

  • fetch — fetch1 [fech] vt. [ME fecchen < OE feccan, earlier fetian < IE * pedyo (extension of base * ped , FOOT) > Ger fassen, to grasp] 1. to go after and come back with; bring; get 2. to cause to come; produce; elicit 3. to draw (a breath) or… …   English World dictionary

  • fetch — s.m.inv. ES ingl. {{wmetafile0}} TS geogr., mar. in oceanografia, l area di mare o di lago sulla quale spira un vento di direzione costante generando onde {{line}} {{/line}} DATA: sec. XX. ETIMO: der. di (to) fetch raggiungere, navigare …   Dizionario italiano

  • fetch — fetch; fetch·ing·ly; …   English syllables


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