fault


fault
/fawlt/, n.
1. a defect or imperfection; flaw; failing: a fault in the brakes; a fault in one's character.
2. responsibility for failure or a wrongful act: It is my fault that we have not finished.
3. an error or mistake: a fault in addition.
4. a misdeed or transgression: to confess one's faults.
5. Sports. (in tennis, handball, etc.)
a. a ball that when served does not land in the proper section of an opponent's court.
b. a failure to serve the ball according to the rules, as from within a certain area.
6. Geol., Mining. a break in the continuity of a body of rock or of a vein, with dislocation along the plane of the fracture (fault plane).
7. Manège. (of a horse jumping in a show) any of a number of improper executions in negotiating a jump, as a tick, knockdown, refusal, or run-out.
8. Elect. a partial or total local failure in the insulation or continuity of a conductor or in the functioning of an electric system.
9. Hunting. a break in the line of scent; a losing of the scent; check.
10. Obs. lack; want.
11. at fault,
a. open to censure; blameworthy: to be at fault for a mistake.
b. in a dilemma; puzzled: to be at fault as to where to go.
c. (of hounds) unable to find the scent.
12. find fault, to seek and make known defects or flaws; complain; criticize: He constantly found fault with my behavior.
13. to a fault, to an extreme degree; excessively: She was generous to a fault.
v.i.
14. to commit a fault; blunder; err.
15. Geol. to undergo faulting.
v.t.
16. Geol. to cause a fault in.
17. to find fault with, blame, or censure.
[1250-1300; ME faute < AF, MF < VL *fallita, n. use of fem. of *fallitus, for L falsus, ptp. of fallere to be wrong]
Syn. 1. blemish; frailty, shortcoming. FAULT, FAILING, FOIBLE, WEAKNESS, VICE imply shortcomings or imperfections in a person. FAULT is the common word used to refer to any of the average shortcomings of a person; when it is used, condemnation is not necessarily implied: Of his many faults the greatest is vanity. FOIBLE, FAILING, WEAKNESS all tend to excuse the person referred to. Of these FOIBLE is the mildest, suggesting a weak point that is slight and often amusing, manifesting itself in eccentricity rather than in wrongdoing: the foibles of artists.
WEAKNESS suggests that the person in question is unable to control a particular impulse, and gives way to self-indulgence: a weakness for pretty women. FAILING is closely akin to FAULT, except that it is particularly applied to humanity at large, suggesting common, often venial, shortcomings: Procrastination and making excuses are common failings. VICE (which may also apply to a sin in itself, apart from a person: the vice of gambling) is the strongest term, and designates a habit that is truly detrimental or evil.
Ant. 1. virtue, strength, merit.

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In geology, a fracture in the rocks of the Earth's crust, where compressional or tensional forces cause the rocks on the opposite sides of the fracture to be displaced relative to each other.

Faults range in length from a few inches to hundreds of miles, and displacement may also range from less than an inch to hundreds of miles along the fracture surface (the fault plane). Most, if not all, earthquakes are caused by rapid movement along faults. Faults are common throughout the world. A well-known example is the San Andreas Fault near the western coast of the U.S. The total movement along this fault during the last few million years appears to have been several miles.

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      in geology, a planar or gently curved fracture in the rocks of the Earth's crust, where compressional or tensional forces cause relative displacement of the rocks on the opposite sides of the fracture. Faults range in length from a few centimetres to many hundreds of kilometres, and displacement likewise may range from less than a centimetre to several hundred kilometres along the fracture surface (the fault plane). In some instances, the movement is distributed over a fault zone composed of many individual faults that occupy a belt hundreds of metres wide. The geographic distribution of faults varies; some large areas have almost none, others are cut by innumerable faults.

      Faults may be vertical, horizontal, or inclined at any angle. Although the angle of inclination of a specific fault plane tends to be relatively uniform, it may differ considerably along its length from place to place. When rocks slip past each other in faulting, the upper or overlying block along the fault plane is called the hanging wall, or headwall; the block below is called the footwall. The fault strike is the direction of the line of intersection between the fault plane and the surface of the Earth. The dip of a fault plane is its angle of inclination measured from the horizontal.

 Faults are classified according to their angle of dip and their relative displacement. Normal dip-slip faults are produced by vertical compression as the Earth's crust lengthens. The hanging wall slides down relative to the footwall. Normal faults are common; they bound many of the mountain ranges of the world and many of the rift valleys found along spreading margins of tectonic plates (plate tectonics). Rift valleys (rift valley) are formed by the sliding of the hanging walls downward many thousands of metres, where they then become the valley floors.

      A block that has dropped relatively downward between two normal faults dipping toward each other is called a graben (horst and graben). A block that has been relatively uplifted between two normal faults that dip away from each other is called a horst (horst and graben). A tilted block that lies between two normal faults dipping in the same direction is a tilted fault block.

      Reverse dip-slip faults result from horizontal compressional forces caused by a shortening, or contraction, of the Earth's crust. The hanging wall moves up and over the footwall. Thrust faults are reverse faults that dip less than 45°. Thrust faults with a very low angle of dip and a very large total displacement are called overthrusts or detachments; these are often found in intensely deformed mountain belts. Large thrust faults are characteristic of compressive tectonic plate boundaries, such as those that have created the Himalayas and the subduction zones (subduction zone) along the west coast of South America.

 Strike-slip (also called transcurrent, wrench, or lateral) faults are similarly caused by horizontal compression, but they release their energy by rock displacement in a horizontal direction almost parallel to the compressional force. The fault plane is essentially vertical, and the relative slip is lateral along the plane. These faults are widespread. Many are found at the boundary between obliquely converging oceanic and continental tectonic plates. A well-known terrestrial example is the San Andreas Fault, which, during the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, had a maximum movement of 6 metres (20 feet).

      Oblique-slip faults have simultaneous displacement up or down the dip and along the strike. The displacement of the blocks on the opposite sides of the fault plane usually is measured in relation to sedimentary strata or other stratigraphic markers, such as veins and dikes (dike). The movement along a fault may be rotational, with the offset blocks rotating relative to one another.

      Fault slip may polish smooth the walls of the fault plane, marking them with striations called slickensides, or it may crush them to a fine-grained, claylike substance known as fault gouge; when the crushed rock is relatively coarse-grained, it is referred to as fault breccia. Occasionally, the beds adjacent to the fault plane fold or bend as they resist slippage because of friction. Areas of deep sedimentary rock cover often show no surface indications of the faulting below.

      Movement of rock along a fault may occur as a continuous creep or as a series of spasmodic jumps of a few metres during a few seconds. Such jumps are separated by intervals during which stress builds up until it overcomes the frictional forces along the fault plane and causes another slip. Most, if not all, earthquakes (earthquake) are caused by rapid slip along faults.

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Universalium. 2010.

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Look at other dictionaries:

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  • fault — [fôlt] n. [ME faute < OFr faulte, a lack < VL * fallita < * fallitus, for L falsus: see FALSE] 1. Obs. failure to have or do what is required; lack 2. something that mars the appearance, character, structure, etc.; defect or failing 3.… …   English World dictionary

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  • fault — n 1 imperfection, deficiency, shortcoming Analogous words: flaw, defect, *blemish: weakness, infirmity (see corresponding adjectives at WEAK) Antonyms: excellence 2 Fault, failing, frailty, foible, vice are comparable when they mean an… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • fault — ► NOUN 1) an unattractive or unsatisfactory feature; a defect or mistake. 2) responsibility for an accident or misfortune. 3) (in tennis) a service that infringes the rules. 4) Geology an extended break in a rock formation, marked by the relative …   English terms dictionary

  • Fault — Fault, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Faulted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Faulting}.] 1. To charge with a fault; to accuse; to find fault with; to blame. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] For that I will not fault thee. Old Song. [1913 Webster] 2. (Geol.) To interrupt the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fault´i|ly — fault|y «FL tee», adjective, fault|i|er, fault|i|est. 1. having faults; containing blemishes or errors; wrong; imperfect; defective: » …   Useful english dictionary

  • fault|y — «FL tee», adjective, fault|i|er, fault|i|est. 1. having faults; containing blemishes or errors; wrong; imperfect; defective: » …   Useful english dictionary


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