Exeter


Exeter
/ek"si teuhr/, n.
1. a city in Devonshire, in SW England: cathedral. 94,100.
2. a town in SE New Hampshire. 11,024.

* * *

ancient Isca Dumnoniorum

City and administrative district (pop., 2001: 111,078), administrative and historic county of Devon, England.

The county town (seat) of Devon, it is located on the River Exe about 10 mi (16 km) above the English Channel and commands an important river crossing. An early British tribe, the Dumnonii, made Exeter their centre; when it was taken by the Romans, they named it Isca Dumnoniorum. The main town in southwestern England during the Middle Ages, Exeter was subjected to a number of sieges. Alfred the Great twice held it against the Danes (877 and с 894); the Danes finally took the city in 1003 but lost it in 1068 to William I (the Conqueror). Exeter's Norman cathedral, consecrated in 1133, houses the Exeter Book, the largest collection extant of Old English poetry. The city has light manufacturing and is a service centre for an extensive region.

* * *

 city (district), administrative and historic county of Devon, England, on the River Exe about 10 miles (16 km) above the river's entry into the English Channel. Exeter is the county town (seat) of Devon. The community derived its early importance from its position at the river crossing.

      An early British tribe, the Dumnonii, made Exeter their centre, and it was taken over by the Romans, who named it Isca Dumnoniorum. Because it was the main town in southwestern England during the Middle Ages, Exeter was subjected to a number of sieges. Alfred the Great (871–899) twice held it against the Danes (877 and c. 894), but it was taken in 1003. In 1068, after an 18-day siege, Exeter surrendered to William the Conqueror.

      During the English Civil Wars the town declared for Parliament, but it was held by the Royalists from 1643 to 1646. Exeter had become a borough before the Norman Conquest; in 1537 it was created a county in itself and remained so until the reorganization of English local government in 1974. Many trade guilds were incorporated in the city; the first, in 1466, was the tailors' guild.

      The Norman cathedral, dedicated to St. Peter, was consecrated in 1133. The present building, begun c. 1275, is in the Decorated style and in this way is different from its twin Norman towers. Other notable buildings include the 14th-century Guildhall, rebuilt in 1468–70, and the Norman castle, most of which was demolished in 1744. Exeter's University College (1922) became the University of Exeter in 1955.

      The port of Exeter is linked to the sea by canal but is accessible only to small vessels. Among its manufacturing industries, metalworking, leatherworking, and the manufacture of paper and agricultural implements are the most important.

      Exeter is one of the best examples of the historic English town, which developed from a Roman-British centre to a medieval cathedral city and county town and now is an administrative and service centre for an extensive region. Area 18 square miles (47 square km). Pop. (2004 est.) 115,200.

      town (township), seat of Rockingham county, southeastern New Hampshire, U.S., on the Exeter River at the falls of the Squamscott River (tidal), southwest of Portsmouth. The town was founded in 1638 by John Wheelwright and a group of religious exiles from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. During its early years it was a commonwealth independent of the English colonies, but an increasingly unfavourable economic situation forced Exeter to voluntarily submit to the jurisdiction of Massachusetts in 1643. Later in the 17th century the area became part of the colony of New Hampshire. From about 1675 to 1725 the town was subjected to numerous Indian attacks, which hindered its growth. A shipbuilding industry subsequently developed. Manufactures now include leather goods, handguns, and electronic equipment.

 During the American Revolution Exeter was a patriot stronghold and served as the provincial capital. The Phillips Exeter Academy, a preparatory school, was founded there in 1781. Historic buildings include the Gilman Garrison House (c. 1690), the Congregational Church (1798), and the Ladd-Gilman House (c. 1721), which is now part of the American Independence Museum. Area 20 square miles (51 square km). Pop. (1990) 12,481; (2000) 14,058.
 

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Exeter —     Ancient Diocese of Exeter     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Ancient Diocese of Exeter     (EXONIA, ISCA DAMNONIORUM, CAER WISE, EXANCEASTER; EXONIENSIS).     English see, chosen by Leofric, Bishop of Crediton, as his cathedral city in 1050.… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Exeter — Exeter, NE U.S. village in Nebraska Population (2000): 712 Housing Units (2000): 297 Land area (2000): 0.636298 sq. miles (1.648005 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 0.636298 sq. miles (1.648005 sq …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • EXETER — EXETER, town in S.W. England. Before the expulsion of the Jews in 1290, Exeter was the most westerly Jewish community in England. The first mention of Jews there is in 1181. Only one Exeter Jew, Amiot, is mentioned as contributing to the… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Exeter, CA — U.S. city in California Population (2000): 9168 Housing Units (2000): 3168 Land area (2000): 2.230185 sq. miles (5.776153 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 2.230185 sq. miles (5.776153 sq. km) FIPS …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Exeter, IL — U.S. village in Illinois Population (2000): 70 Housing Units (2000): 32 Land area (2000): 0.689653 sq. miles (1.786193 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 0.689653 sq. miles (1.786193 sq. km) FIPS… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Exeter, MO — U.S. city in Missouri Population (2000): 707 Housing Units (2000): 324 Land area (2000): 0.795265 sq. miles (2.059726 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 0.795265 sq. miles (2.059726 sq. km) FIPS… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Exeter, NE — U.S. village in Nebraska Population (2000): 712 Housing Units (2000): 297 Land area (2000): 0.636298 sq. miles (1.648005 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 0.636298 sq. miles (1.648005 sq. km) FIPS… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Exeter, NH — U.S. Census Designated Place in New Hampshire Population (2000): 9759 Housing Units (2000): 4376 Land area (2000): 4.375410 sq. miles (11.332259 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.166588 sq. miles (0.431461 sq. km) Total area (2000): 4.541998 sq. miles …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Exeter, PA — U.S. borough in Pennsylvania Population (2000): 5955 Housing Units (2000): 2641 Land area (2000): 4.658056 sq. miles (12.064310 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.306121 sq. miles (0.792851 sq. km) Total area (2000): 4.964177 sq. miles (12.857161 sq.… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Exĕter — (spr. Ekkseter), 1) Hauptstadt der englischen Grafschaft Devonshire, am Ex; Sitz eines Bischofs, dessen Diöcese außer Devonshire noch den größten Theil der Grafschaft Cornwall umfaßt; St. Peterskirche (Kathedrale im gothisch normannischen Style,… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Exĕter — Exĕter, 1) Stadt (city) und Grafschaft im südwestlichen England, am Exe, ist Sitz eines Bischofs, hat eine prächtige Kathedrale ursprünglich normannischen Stils (1112), aber in ihrer jetzigen Gestalt gotisch aus der Zeit von 1280–1370,1877… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.