entrechat


entrechat
Fr. /ahonn trddeuh shann"/, n., pl. entrechats Fr. /-shann"/. Ballet.
a jump in which the dancer crosses the feet a number of times while in the air.
[1765-75; < F, alter. of It (capriola) intrecciata intwined (caper), equiv. to in- IN-2 + trecci- TRESS + -ata -ATE1]

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 (probably from Italian intrecciare: “to weave,” or “to braid”), jump in ballet, beginning in the fifth position, during which the dancer crosses his straight legs at the lower calf. Numerous rapid crossings make the entrechat a spectacular jump. Numbers (trois, “three”; quatre, “four”; and so on) are affixed to the term to designate the amount of leg movement (entrechat-quatre has two crossings; entrechat-dix has five). The dancer lands on both feet for even-numbered and on one foot for odd-numbered entrechats. Vaslav Nijinsky's (Nijinsky, Vaslav) famous jumps reputedly included the entrechat-dix, and an entrechat-douze (six crossings) was performed more recently on English television as danced by Wayne Sleep.

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Universalium. 2010.