engraving


engraving
/en gray"ving/, n.
1. the act or art of a person who or thing that engraves.
2. the art of forming designs by cutting, corrosion by acids, a photographic process, etc., on the surface of a metal plate, block of wood, or the like, for or as for the purpose of taking off impressions or prints of the design so formed.
3. the design engraved.
4. an engraved plate or block.
5. an impression or print from this.
[1595-1605; ENGRAVE + -ING1]

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Any of various processes of cutting a design into a plate or block of metal or wood.

The cutting is done by a graver, or burin, on a copper, zinc, aluminum, or magnesium plate, and the design is printed with a roller press from ink rubbed into the incised grooves. Wood engraving derives from the woodcut, but the use of the hard, smooth boxwood, cut with the burin commonly used by the copper-plate engraver, produces a finer, more detailed image. By contrast with engraving from metal plates, the printing of wood engravings is done from the surface of the plate or block; the parts that are not to be printed are cut away. See also etching.

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art
 technique of making prints from metal plates into which a design has been incised with a cutting tool called a burin. Modern examples are almost invariably made from copperplates; hence, the process is also called copperplate engraving. Another term for the process, line engraving, derives from the fact that this technique reproduces only linear marks. Tone and shading, however, can be suggested by making parallel lines or crosshatching.

      Engraving originated independently in the Rhine valley in Germany and in northern Italy about the middle of the 15th century. It seems to have been first developed by German goldsmiths now known only by their initials or pseudonyms, the most prominent being the Master E.S. and the Master of the Playing Cards. Martin Schongauer (Schongauer, Martin) is the first engraver known to have been not only a goldsmith but also a painter. His “Temptation of St. Anthony” (c. 1470) is unprecedented in its sophisticated use of the medium to achieve a sense of form and surface texture.

      In Italy, engraving grew out of both the goldsmith's art and niello work, a type of decorative metalwork. One of its earliest practitioners was the Florentine goldsmith and niellist Maso Finiguerra (1426–64). Major Italian painters adopted engraving much more enthusiastically than did their German counterparts. Before the 15th century had passed, important engravings had been made by two great Italian painters: Andrea Mantegna (Mantegna, Andrea) and Antonio Pollaiuolo. Although its quick association with painting in Italy resulted in such prodigious prints as Pollaiuolo's “Battle of the Nudes” (c. 1465), this also prevented the independent development of engraving, which soon was used primarily to reproduce paintings. By the 16th century, the reproductive role of engraving had become so firmly established that Italy's greatest master of engraving technique, Marcantonio Raimondi (Raimondi, Marcantonio), is mainly known for his copies of Raphael's paintings.

      In northern Europe, however, engraving followed its own course, and two of its greatest 16th-century masters, Albrecht Dürer and Lucas van Leyden, produced some of their finest original work in this technique.

      During the rest of the 16th century, engravers such as Hendrik Goltzius (1558–1617) continued to develop increasingly brilliant techniques. Simultaneously, however, engraving became more and more restricted to reproducing paintings. This trend, which continued throughout the 17th century, was facilitated by the popularization of techniques capable of producing gradations of tone. The dotting of the plate with short jabs of the burin, common from the late 15th century, evolved in the late 17th and 18th centuries into the techniques of stipple engraving and crayon manner (also called chalk-manner, or pastel-manner, engraving). These techniques scored the plate with numberless dots and nicks made with a burin or special tools called rockers and roulettes. With mezzotint (q.v.), a related technique invented in the 17th century by Ludwig von Siegen, they almost completely replaced line engraving in the 18th century. It was revived to an extent in the 20th century by the French artist Jacques Villon and the English artists Eric Gill and Stanley William Hayter (Hayter, Stanley William). The latter demonstrated that line engraving is a suitable medium for much modern art, including abstraction. The American printmakers Mauricio Lasansky and Gabor Peterdi also produced engravings.

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Universalium. 2010.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Engraving — En*grav ing, n. 1. The act or art of producing upon hard material incised or raised patterns, characters, lines, and the like; especially, the art of producing such lines, etc., in the surface of metal plates or blocks of wood. Engraving is used… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • engraving — engraving; pho·to·engraving; …   English syllables

  • engraving — index inscription, stamp Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • engraving — [n] carving of letters or design into something blocking, chasing, chiselling, cutting, dry point, enchasing, etching, illustration, impression, inscribing, inscription, intaglio, lithograph, mezzotint, photoengraving, photogravure, print,… …   New thesaurus

  • engraving — ► NOUN 1) a print made from an engraved plate, block, or other surface. 2) the process or art of cutting or carving a design on a hard surface, especially so as to make a print …   English terms dictionary

  • engraving — [en grāv′iŋ, ingrāv′iŋ] n. 1. the act, process, or art of one who engraves 2. an engraved plate, drawing, or design 3. a print made from an engraved surface …   English World dictionary

  • Engraving — A copperplate engraver at work Engraving is the practice of incising a design on to a hard, usually flat surface, by cutting grooves into it. The result may be a decorated object in itself, as when silver, gold, steel, or glass are engraved, or… …   Wikipedia

  • Engraving — (Roget s Thesaurus) < N PARAG:Engraving >N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 engraving engraving chalcography Sgm: N 1 line engraving line engraving mezzotint engraving stipple engraving chalk engraving Sgm: N 1 dry point dry point bur Sgm: N 1 etching …   English dictionary for students

  • engraving — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Art of making designs by etching Nouns 1. engraving; line, mezzotint, or stipple engraving; drypoint, draw point, etching, intaglio, gravure, copperplate, silverpoint; steel or wood engraving; xylography …   English dictionary for students

  • engraving — Synonyms and related words: CYSP sculpture, abstract, abstract art, abstraction, altarpiece, anaglyph, anaglyptics, anaglyptography, aquatint, architectural sculpture, art, art form, artist, arts and crafts, arts of design, autolithograph, bezel …   Moby Thesaurus


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