endive


endive
/en"duyv, ahn"deev/; Fr. /ahonn deev"/, n., pl. endives /-duyvz, -deevz/; Fr. /-deev"/.
1. a composite plant, Cichorium endivia, having a rosette of often curly-edged leaves used in salads. Cf. escarole.
2. Also called Belgian endive, French endive, witloof. a young chicory plant, deprived of light to form a narrow head of whitish leaves that are eaten as a cooked vegetable or used raw in salads.
3. Furniture. an ornamental motif having the form of an arrangement of acanthus or endive leaves.
[1325-75; ME < MF MGk entýbia, pl. of ENTÝBION, deriv. of earlier éntybon < L intubum, intibum, earlier intubus chicory, endive, perh. < Sem]

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Edible annual leafy plant (Cichorium endivia) of the composite family.

It is variously believed to have originated in Egypt and Indonesia, and it has been cultivated in Europe since the 16th century. The many kinds of endive form two groups: the curly or narrow-leaved endive (C. endivia, variety crispa) and the Batavian, or broad-leaved, endive (C. endivia, variety latifolia), which is also called escarole. The former is used mostly for salads, the latter for cooking.

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plant
      (Cichorium endivia), edible annual leafy plant of the family Asteraceae, variously believed to have originated in Egypt and Indonesia and cultivated in Europe since the 16th century. Its many varieties form two groups, the curly-leaved, or narrow-leaved, endive (crispa), and the Batavian, or broad-leaved, endive (latifolia). The former is mostly used for salads, the latter for cooking.

      The plant requires a rich, light, well-drained, unshaded soil. When sown late in the season, it behaves as a biennial. About three months after sowing, the plant's outer leaves are tied together or are covered, to exclude light. This prevents the development of the natural bitter taste. This bleaching process takes 10 days to 4 weeks.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Endive — Escarole endive Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae (un …   Wikipedia

  • endive — [ ɑ̃div ] n. f. • indivie déb. XIVe; probablt lat. imp. intibum « chicorée sauvage », du gr. entubion 1 ♦ Bot. Endive ou chicorée endive : chicorée d une espèce comprenant la chicorée frisée et la scarole. 2 ♦ Cour. Pousse blanche de la chicorée… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Endive — En dive, n. [F. endive (cf. Pr., Sp. Pg., & It. endivia), fr. a deriv. of L. intibus, intybus, endive.] (Bot.) A composite herb ({Cichorium Endivia}). Its finely divided and much curled leaves, when blanched, are used for salad. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • endive — late 14c., from O.Fr. endive, from M.L. endiva or L.L. intibus, perhaps from Medieval Gk. entybon (though OED considers this a borrowing from Latin), which is perhaps of Eastern origin (perhaps from Egyptian tybi January, which is when the plant… …   Etymology dictionary

  • endive — Endive, Il vient de Intybum. Une sorte de cichorée qu on appelle Endive, Seris …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • endive — ► NOUN 1) a plant with bitter curly or smooth leaves, eaten in salads. 2) (also Belgian endive) N. Amer. a chicory crown. ORIGIN Old French, from Greek entubon …   English terms dictionary

  • endive — ENDIVE. s. f. Plante potagère du nombre des chicorées …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • endive — [en′dīv΄, än′dēv΄] n. [ME & OFr < ML endivia < MGr endivi < L intibus < Gr entybon, prob. < Egypt tʾ ʿʾ bt, January (when it is said to grow in Egypt)] 1. a) a cultivated, lettucelike plant (Cichorium endivia) of the composite… …   English World dictionary

  • Endive — Pour les articles homonymes, voir Chicon (homonymie) et Endive (homonymie). Endive …   Wikipédia en Français

  • endive — (an di v ) s. f. La chicorée des jardins (cichorium endivia, L.). HISTORIQUE    XVIe s. •   Ozeille, bourroche, buglon, cichorée, endive et semblables, PARÉ VIII, 14. •   La cichorée ou endive est espece de laictue, O. DE SERRES 536 ; 569 …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré