Elijah


Elijah
/i luy"jeuh/, n.
1. a Hebrew prophet of the 9th century B.C. I Kings 17; II Kings 2.
2. a male given name.
[ < Heb eliyyah lit., my God is Yahweh]

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I
or Elias Hebrew Eliyyahu

flourished 9th century BC

Hebrew prophet.

The Bible related that he denounced foreign cults and defeated 450 prophets of Baal in a contest on Mount Carmel. In doing so, he earned the enmity of King Ahab and his consort, Jezebel, who forced him to flee into the wilderness. Later he was taken up into heaven in a whirlwind, leaving behind his successor, Elisha. His insistence that only the God of Israel is entitled to the name of divinity expresses a fully conscious monotheism. He is also recognized as a prophet in Islam.
II
(as used in expressions)
Lovejoy Elijah Parish
Muhammad Elijah
Elijah Poole
Boudinot Elias
Canetti Elias
Disney Walter Elias
Howe Elias
Lönnrot Elias

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▪ Hebrew prophet
Introduction
also spelled  Elias  or  Elia,  Hebrew  Eliyyahu 
flourished 9th century BC
 
 Hebrew prophet who ranks with Moses in saving the religion of Yahweh from being corrupted by the nature worship of Baal. Elijah's name means “Yahweh is my God” and is spelled Elias in some versions of the Bible. The story of his prophetic career in the northern kingdom of Israel during the reigns of Kings Ahab and Ahaziah is told in 1 Kings 17–19 and 2 Kings 1–2 in the Old Testament. Elijah claimed that there was no reality except the God of Israel, stressing monotheism to the people with possibly unprecedented emphasis. He is commemorated by Christians on July 20 and is recognized as a prophet by Islām.

Historical setting
 The Israelite king Omri had allied himself with the Phoenician cities of the coast, and his son Ahab was married to Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal, king of Tyre and Sidon. Jezebel, with her Tyrian courtiers and a large contingent of pagan priests and prophets, propagated her native religion in a sanctuary built for Baal in the royal city of Samaria. This meant that the Israelites accepted Baal as well as Yahweh, putting Yahweh on a par with a nature-god whose supreme manifestations were the elements and biological fertility, celebrated often in an orgiastic cult. Jezebel's policies intensified the gradual contamination of the religion of Yahweh by the Canaanite religion of Baal, a process made easier by the sapping of the Israelites' faith in Yahweh.

Story
      Elijah was from Tishbe in Gilead. The narrative in 1 Kings relates how he suddenly appears during Ahab's reign to proclaim a drought in punishment of the cult of Baal that Jezebel was promoting in Israel at Yahweh's expense. Later Elijah meets 450 prophets of Baal in a contest of strength on Mount Carmel to determine which deity is the true God of Israel. Sacrifices are placed on an altar to Baal and one to Yahweh. The pagan prophets' ecstatic appeals to Baal to kindle the wood on his altar are unsuccessful, but Elijah's prayers to Yahweh are answered by a fire on his altar. This outcome is taken as decisive by the Israelites, who slay the priests and prophets of Baal under Elijah's direction. The drought thereupon ends with the falling of rain.

      Elijah flees the wrath of the vengeful Jezebel by undertaking a pilgrimage to Mount Horeb (Sinai, Mount) (Sinai), where he is at first disheartened in his struggle and then miraculously renewed. In a further narrative, King Ahab has a man named Naboth condemned to death in order to gain possession of his vineyard. Ahab's judicial murder of Naboth and confiscation of his vineyard arouse Elijah as the upholder of the moral law, as before he had come forward as the champion of monotheism. Elijah denounces Ahab for his crimes, asserting that all men are subject to the law of God and are therefore equals. Later Ahab's son, King Azariah, appeals to Baal to heal him of an illness, and Elijah once more upholds the exclusive rights of Yahweh by bringing down “fire from heaven.” After bestowing his mantle on his successor, Elisha, the prophet Elijah is taken up to heaven in a whirlwind.

Theological significance
      One of the most important moments in the history of monotheism is the climax of Elijah's struggle with Baalism. His momentous words, “If Yahweh is God, follow him, but if Baal, then follow him”—especially when taken with the prayer “Hear me, Yahweh, that this people may know that you, Yahweh, are God”—show that more is at stake than simply allotting to divinities their particular spheres of influence. The true question is whether Yahweh or Baal is God, simply and universally. Elijah's words proclaim that there is no reality except the God of Israel, there are no other beings entitled to the name of divinity. The acclamation of the people, “Yahweh, he is God” expresses a fully conscious monotheism, never before perhaps brought home to them so clearly.

      Elijah's deepest prophetic experience takes place on his pilgrimage to Horeb, where he learns that God is not in the storm, the earthquake, or the lightning. Nature, so far from being God's embodiment, is not even an adequate symbol. God is invisible and spiritual and is best known in the intellectual word of revelation, “the still, small voice.” The transcendence of God receives here one of its earliest expressions. Elijah's story also expresses for the first time a thought that was to dominate Hebrew prophecy: in contrast to the bland hopes of the people, salvation is bestowed only on a “remnant,” those purified by God's judgment. The theme of the later prophets, that morality must be at the heart of ritual worship, is also taught by Elijah, who upholds the unity of law and religion against the despotic cruelty of a king influenced by a pagan wife. Elijah's work may also be regarded as a protest against every effort to find religious experience in self-induced ecstasy and sensual frenzy rather than in a faith linked with reason and morality.

The Rev. Kevin Smyth Ed.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • ELIJAH — (Heb. אֵלִיָּהוּ, also אֵלִיָּה), Israelite prophet active in Israel in the reigns of ahab and Ahaziah (ninth century B.C.E.). In the opinion of some scholars, the designation the Tishbite of the inhabitants of Gilead (I Kings 17:1) supports the… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Elijah — ist der Name eines biblischen Propheten, siehe Elija der Name eines schweizerischen Reggaemusikers, siehe Elijah (Musiker) Elijah ist der Vorname folgender weiterer Personen: Elija b. Loeb Fulda (ca. 1650–1720), jüdischer Gelehrter Elijah Blue… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Elijah — • Old Testament prophet Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Elijah     Elijah     † Catholic E …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Elijah — m Biblical: name (meaning ‘Yahweh is God’) of an Israelite prophet whose exploits are recounted in the First and Second Book of Kings. Elijah s victory over the prophets of Baal on Mount Carmel played an important part in maintaining the Jewish… …   First names dictionary

  • Elijah — name of the great O.T. prophet, from Heb. Elijjah, lit. the Lord is God. The Greek form is Elias …   Etymology dictionary

  • Elijah — [ē lī′jə, ilī′jə] n. [Heb eliyahu, lit., Jehovah is God] 1. a masculine name: dim. Lige; var. Elias, Ellis, Eliot 2. Bible a prophet of Israel in the 9th century B.C.: 1 Kings 17 19; 2 Kings 2:1 11 …   English World dictionary

  • Elijah — This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. For other uses, see Elijah (disambiguation). Prophet Elijah Elijah reviving the Son of the Widow of Zarephath by Louis Hersent Prophet, Apostle to Ah …   Wikipedia

  • Elijah —    Whose God is Jehovah.    1) The Tishbite, the Elias of the New Testament, is suddenly introduced to our notice in 1 Kings 17:1 as delivering a message from the Lord to Ahab. There is mention made of a town called Thisbe, south of Kadesh, but… …   Easton's Bible Dictionary

  • Elijah — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. Elijah est un nom propre qui peut désigner : Sommaire 1 Prénom et patronyme 2 P …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Elijah — The most notable of the ecstatic prophets of the 9th cent. BCE, coming in time between the orgiastic bands of prophets who encountered Saul (1 Sam. 10:5 ff.) and the classical prophets of the 8th cent. Although the narratives relating Elijah s… …   Dictionary of the Bible


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