electric field


electric field
a vector quantity from which is determined the magnitude and direction of the force (electric force) on a charged particle due to the presence of other charged particles, accelerated charged particles, or time-varying currents. Symbol: E
[1895-1900]

* * *

Region around an electric charge in which an electric force is exerted on another charge.

The strength of an electric field E at any point is defined as the electric force F exerted per unit positive electric charge q at that point, or E = F/q. An electric field has both magnitude and direction and can be represented by lines of force, or field lines, that start on positive charges and terminate on negative charges. The electric field is stronger where the field lines are close together than where they are farther apart. The value of the electric field has dimensions of force per unit charge and is measured in units of newtons per coulomb.

* * *

      region around an electric charge in which an electric force is exerted on another charge. Instead of considering the electric force as a direct interaction of two electric charges at a distance from each other, one charge is considered the source of an electric field that extends outward into the surrounding space, and the force exerted on a second charge in this space is considered as a direct interaction between the electric field and the second charge. The strength of an electric field E at any point may be defined as the electric force F exerted per unit positive electric charge q at that point, or simply E = F/q. If the second, or test, charge is twice as great, the resultant force is doubled; but their quotient, the measure of the electric field E, remains the same at any given point. The strength of the electric field depends on the source charge, not on the test charge. Strictly speaking, the introduction of a small test charge, which itself has an electric field, slightly modifies the existing field. The electric field may be thought of as the force per unit positive charge that would be exerted before the field is disturbed by the presence of the test charge.

 The direction of the force that is exerted on a negative charge is opposite that which is exerted on a positive charge. Because an electric field has both magnitude and direction, the direction of the force on a positive charge is chosen arbitrarily as the direction of the electric field. Because positive charges repel each other, the electric field around an isolated positive charge is oriented radially outward (see illustration—>). When they are represented by lines of force, or field lines (force, line of), electric fields are depicted as starting on positive charges and terminating on negative charges. The lines indicate the path that a small positive test charge would take if it were placed in the field. A line tangent to a field line indicates the direction of the electric field at that point. Where the field lines are close together, the electric field is stronger than where they are farther apart. The magnitude of the electric field around an electric charge, considered as source of the electric field, depends on how the charge is distributed in space. For a charge concentrated nearly at a point, the electric field is directly proportional to the amount of charge; it is inversely proportional to the square of the distance radially away from the centre of the source charge and depends also upon the nature of the medium. The presence of a material medium always diminishes the electric field below the value it has in a vacuum.

      Thus, each point in space has an electric property associated with it, the magnitude and direction of which are expressed by the value of E, called electric field strength, or electric field intensity, or simply the electric field. Knowledge of the value of the electric field at a point without any specific knowledge of what produced the field is all that is needed to determine what will happen to electric charges close to that particular point.

      At times the electric field itself may become detached from the source charge, as in the case of charges accelerating up and down the transmitting antenna of a television station. The electric field with an accompanying magnetic field is propagated through space as a radiated wave at the same speed as that of light. Such electromagnetic waves indicate that electric fields are generated not only from electric charges but also from changing magnetic fields.

      The value of the electric field has dimensions of force per unit charge. In the metre-kilogram-second and SI systems, the appropriate units are newtons per coulomb, equivalent to volts per metre. In the centimetre-gram-second system, the electric field is expressed in units of dynes per electrostatic unit (esu), equivalent to statvolts per centimetre.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • electric field — n a region associated with a distribution of electric charge or a varying magnetic field in which forces due to that charge or field act upon other electric charges * * * a region of space in which an electric intensity exists at every point,… …   Medical dictionary

  • electric field — n. the electrically charged region of space surrounding an electrically charged body …   English World dictionary

  • Electric field — In physics, the space surrounding an electric charge or in the presence of a time varying magnetic field has a property called an electric field (that can also be equated to electric flux density). This electric field exerts a force on other… …   Wikipedia

  • electric field — elektrinis laukas statusas T sritis automatika atitikmenys: angl. electric field vok. elektrisches Feld, n rus. электрическое поле, n pranc. champ électrique, m …   Automatikos terminų žodynas

  • electric field — elektrinis laukas statusas T sritis Standartizacija ir metrologija apibrėžtis Elektrinis (išorinio) elektromagnetinio lauko posistemis, kurio poveikis elektringajai dalelei (kūnui) nepriklauso nuo jos greičio ir magnetinio momento. atitikmenys:… …   Penkiakalbis aiškinamasis metrologijos terminų žodynas

  • electric field — elektrinis laukas statusas T sritis fizika atitikmenys: angl. electric field vok. elektrisches Feld, n rus. электрическое поле, n pranc. champ électrique, m …   Fizikos terminų žodynas

  • electric field — noun Date: circa 1889 a region associated with a distribution of electric charge or a varying magnetic field in which forces due to that charge or field act upon other electric charges …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • electric field — noun a field of force surrounding a charged particle • Hypernyms: ↑field, ↑field of force, ↑force field • Hyponyms: ↑electrostatic field …   Useful english dictionary

  • electric field — elec′tric field′ n. phs a region of space near a charged particle in which an electric force acts on other charged particles • Etymology: 1895–1900 …   From formal English to slang

  • electric field — /əˌlɛktrɪk ˈfild/ (say uh.lektrik feeld) noun a condition of space in the vicinity of an electric charge, a varying electric current, or a moving magnet which manifests itself as a force on an electric charge within that space …   Australian English dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.