earthworm


earthworm
/errth"werrm'/, n.
1. any one of numerous annelid worms that burrow in soil and feed on soil nutrients and decaying organic matter.
2. Archaic. a mean or groveling person.
[1400-50; late ME ertheworm. See EARTH, WORM]
Regional Variation. The EARTHWORM, a commonly used bait for angling, is also called an ANGLEWORM in the Northern U.S. and a FISHWORM in the Northern and Midland U.S. and in New England. It is called a FISHING WORM in parts of the Midland and Southern U.S., and a WIGGLER in the Southern U.S.
Because the worm often comes to the surface of the earth when the ground is cool or wet, it is also called a NIGHTWALKER in New England, a NIGHTCRAWLER, chiefly in the Northern, North Midland, and Western U.S., and a DEW WORM, chiefly in the Inland North and Canada. It is also called a RED WORM in the North Central, South Midland, and Southern U.S.

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Any of more than 1,800 species of terrestrial worms, particularly members of the genus Lumbricus (class Oligochaeta of the annelid order).

Earthworms exist in all soils of the world that have sufficient moisture and organic content. The most common U.S. species, L. terrestris, grows to about 10 in. (25 cm), but an Australian species can grow as long as 11 ft (3.3 m). The segmented body is tapered at both ends. Earthworms eat decaying organisms and, in the process, ingest soil, sand, and pebbles, which aerates the soil, promotes drainage, and improves the soil's nutrient content for plants. Earthworms are eaten by many animals.

Earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris).

John Markham

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also called  angleworm 
  any one of more than 1,800 species of terrestrial worms of the class Oligochaeta (phylum Annelida)—in particular, members of the genus Lumbricus. Seventeen native species and 13 introduced species (from Europe) occur in the eastern United States, L. terrestris being the most common. Earthworms occur in virtually all soils of the world in which the moisture and organic content are sufficient to sustain them. One of the most detailed studies of earthworm activities was conducted by English naturalist Charles Darwin.

      Members of one Australian species can grow as long as 3.3 metres (about 11 feet). L. terrestris grows to about 25 centimetres (10 inches). This species is reddish brown, but some earthworms (e.g., Allolobophora chlorotica, native to Great Britain) are green. The reddish tinge of L. terrestris results from the presence of the pigment hemoglobin in its blood.

      The earthworm body is divided into ringlike segments (as many as 150 in L. terrestris). Some internal organs, including the excretory organs, are duplicated in each segment. Between segments 32 and 37 is the clitellum, a slightly bulged, discoloured organ that produces a cocoon for enclosing the earthworm's eggs. The body is tapered at both ends, with the tail end the blunter of the two. Earthworms cannot see or hear, but they are sensitive to both light and vibrations.

      Their food consists of decaying plants and other organisms; as they eat, however, earthworms also ingest large amounts of soil, sand, and tiny pebbles. It has been estimated that an earthworm ingests and discards its own weight in food and soil every day.

      Earthworms are hermaphroditic; i.e., functional reproductive organs of both sexes occur in the same individual. The eggs of one individual, however, are fertilized by the sperm of another individual. During mating two earthworms are bound together by a sticky mucus while each transfers sperm to the other. The worms separate and form cocoons; the cocoon moves forward, picking up eggs at the 14th segment; at the 9th and 10th segments it picks up the sperm deposited by the other earthworm. The cocoon slides over the head, and fertilization takes place. Within 24 hours after the worms mate, the cocoon is deposited in the soil.

      Miniature earthworms usually emerge from the cocoon after two to four weeks. They become sexually mature in 60 to 90 days and attain full growth in about one year.

      Earthworms usually remain near the soil surface, but they are known to tunnel as deep as 2 m during periods of dryness or in winter. One Asian species is known to climb trees to escape drowning after heavy rainfall.

      Earthworms provide food for a large variety of birds and other animals. Indirectly they provide food for humans by assisting plant growth. Earthworms aerate the soil, promote drainage, and draw organic material into their burrow. This last service accelerates the decomposition of organic matter and produces more nutritive materials for growing plants. Earthworms also serve as fish bait; hence, the name angleworm.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • earthworm — (n.) 1590s, from EARTH (Cf. earth) + WORM (Cf. worm) (n.). In this sense Old English had eorðmata. Old English also had angel twæcce earthworm used as bait, with second element from root of twitch, sometimes used in medieval times as a medicament …   Etymology dictionary

  • Earthworm — Earth worm , n. 1. (Zo[ o]l.) Any worm of the genus {Lumbricus} and allied genera, found in damp soil. One of the largest and most abundant species in Europe and America is {L. terrestris}; many others are known; called also {angleworm} and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • earthworm — ► NOUN ▪ a burrowing segmented worm that lives in the soil …   English terms dictionary

  • earthworm — [ʉrth′wʉrm΄] n. any of a number of oligochaetous worms that burrow in the soil, esp. any of a genus (Lumbricus) very important in aerating and fertilizing the soil …   English World dictionary

  • Earthworm — Taxobox name = Earthworm image width = 250px image2 width = 250px image2 caption = Lumbricus terrestris, the Common European Earthworm regnum = Animalia phylum = Annelida classis = Oligochaeta ordo = Haplotaxida subordo = Lumbricina subdivision… …   Wikipedia

  • earthworm — UK [ˈɜː(r)θˌwɜː(r)m] / US [ˈɜrθˌwɜrm] noun [countable] Word forms earthworm : singular earthworm plural earthworms a type of worm that lives in soil …   English dictionary

  • earthworm — [[t]ɜ͟ː(r)θwɜː(r)m[/t]] earthworms N COUNT An earthworm is a kind of worm which lives in the ground …   English dictionary

  • earthworm — noun Date: 14th century a terrestrial annelid worm (class Oligochaeta); especially any of a family (Lumbricidae) of numerous widely distributed hermaphroditic worms that move through the soil by means of setae and feed on decaying organic matter …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • earthworm — noun a) A worm that lives in the ground; a worm of Lumbricidae family, or, more generally, of Lumbricina suborder. b) A disparaging reference to a person, particularly one who grovels. Syn: groundworm …   Wiktionary

  • earthworm — (Roget s IV) n. Syn. annelid, angleworm, night crawler, dew worm, wiggler; see also worm 1 …   English dictionary for students


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