dwarf


dwarf
dwarflike, adj.dwarfness, n.
/dwawrf/, n., pl. dwarfs, dwarves, adj., v.
n.
1. a person of abnormally small stature owing to a pathological condition, esp. one suffering from cretinism or some other disease that produces disproportion or deformation of features and limbs.
2. an animal or plant much smaller than the average of its kind or species.
3. (in folklore) a being in the form of a small, often misshapen and ugly, man, usually having magic powers.
4. Astron. See dwarf star.
adj.
5. of unusually small stature or size; diminutive.
v.t.
6. to cause to appear or seem small in size, extent, character, etc., as by being much larger or better: He dwarfed all his rivals in athletic ability.
7. to make dwarf or dwarfish; prevent the due development of.
v.i.
8. to become stunted or smaller.
[bef. 900; ME dwerf, OE dweorh; r. ME dwerg, OE dweorg; c. OHG twerg, ON dvergr]
Syn. 1. DWARF, MIDGET, PYGMY are terms for a very small person. A DWARF is someone checked in growth or stunted, or in some way not normally formed. A MIDGET (not in technical use) is someone perfect in form and normal in function, but diminutive. A PYGMY is properly a member of one of certain small-sized peoples of Africa and Asia, but the word is often used imprecisely to mean dwarf or midget. DWARF is a term often used to describe very small plants. PYGMY is used to describe very small animals. 2. runt, miniature.
Ant. 1, 5. giant.

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(as used in expressions)

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Introduction
 an individual who is much below the ordinary stature or size for his ethnic group or species. (For the physiology of dwarf human beings, see dwarfism. See also Pygmy.)

Folklore
      In Teutonic and especially Scandinavian mythology and folklore, the term dwarf (Old Norse: dvergr) denoted a species of fairy inhabiting the interiors of mountains and the lower levels of mines. Dwarfs were of various types, all of small stature, some being no more than 18 inches (45 cm) high and others about the height of a two-year-old child. In appearance they were sometimes beautiful, but more usually they resembled grave old men with long beards and, in some cases, humped backs.

      The mountain dwarfs were organized in kingdoms or tribes, with their own kings, chieftains, and armies. They lived in subterranean halls, believed to be full of gold and precious stones. They were principally famous for their skill in all kinds of metalwork and the forging of magical swords and rings, but they were also credited with profound wisdom and secret knowledge, having power to foresee the future, assume other forms, and make themselves invisible.

      Many legends show dwarfs as kindly beings, generous to those who pleased them but vengeful when offended. The Swiss (Switzerland) dwarfs, or “earth-men,” sometimes helped in agricultural work, found straying animals, and put out firewood or fruit for poor children to find. In Scandinavia and Germany also they were friendly to men, but occasionally they stole corn, teased cattle, and abducted children and young girls. Services rendered to them were often repaid by gifts of gold from their hoards; but those who stole their treasures either met with great misfortune thereafter or found the gold turned to dead leaves when they reached home.

      Mine-dwelling (mining) dwarfs were usually more capricious and spiteful than their mountain brothers. They could be heard moving about the lower levels and were sometimes seen by miners, who took care to placate them by gifts of food.

History
      In some societies dwarfs (dwarfism) have served as favourites, jesters, or entertainers in the courts of sovereigns and the households of important persons. Household dwarfs were kept by the early pharaohs of Egypt and still abounded at the courts of the Ptolemies. They played no part in Homeric and Classical Greece but flourished in imperial Rome, where slave children were sometimes stunted to increase their price. Household dwarfs were known in medieval Europe, and during the Renaissance their vogue increased and individual dwarfs became famous. Isabella d'Este designed part of her palace for them and remembered two in her will. The paintings of Diego Velázquez record the appearance of the dwarfs of the court of Philip IV of Spain. In the 18th and 19th centuries, the tsars and noblemen of Russia kept innumerable dwarfs. Elaborate dwarf weddings were celebrated at court, and in 1710 a dwarf couple spent their wedding night in the tsar's bedchamber.

      Dwarfs occasionally held responsible positions but were primarily entertainers. In western Europe household dwarfs were still heard of in the 18th century, but the institution declined. The public's fascination with dwarfs continued into the 19th century. American showman P.T. Barnum publicized Charles Stratton (Stratton, Charles) (“General Tom Thumb”), among the most popular attractions in his American Museum of curiosities, and Stratton became an international star.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Dwarf — Dwarf, n.; pl. {Dwarfs}. [OE. dwergh, dwerf, dwarf, AS. dweorg, dweorh; akin to D. dwerg, MHG. twerc, G. zwerg, Icel. dvergr, Sw. & Dan. dverg; of unknown origin.] 1. An animal or plant which is much below the ordinary size of its species or kind …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dwarf — n Dwarf, pygmy, midget, manikin, homunculus, runt are comparable when they mean an individual and usually a person of diminutive size. Dwarf is the general term not only for a human being but for any animal or plant that is definitely below the… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

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  • Dwarf — Dwarf, v. i. To become small; to diminish in size. [1913 Webster] Strange power of the world that, the moment we enter it, our great conceptions dwarf. Beaconsfield. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dwarf — [adj] miniature, tiny baby, diminutive, low, petite, pocket, small, undersized; concept 773 Ant. big, giant, huge, large dwarf [n] very small person bantam, dwarfling, homunculus, Lilliputian*, midget, Tom Thumb*; concept 424 Ant. giant dwarf …   New thesaurus

  • dwarf — ► NOUN (pl. dwarfs or dwarves) 1) a member of a mythical race of short, stocky human like creatures. 2) an abnormally small person. 3) (before another noun ) (of an animal or plant) much smaller than is usual for its type or species. 4) (also… …   English terms dictionary

  • Dwarf — Dwarf, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dwarfed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dwarfing}.] To hinder from growing to the natural size; to make or keep small; to stunt. Addison. [1913 Webster] Even the most common moral ideas and affections . . . would be stunted and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dwarf — dwarf. См. нанизм. (Источник: «Англо русский толковый словарь генетических терминов». Арефьев В.А., Лисовенко Л.А., Москва: Изд во ВНИРО, 1995 г.) …   Молекулярная биология и генетика. Толковый словарь.

  • dwarf — index lessen, minimize Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary


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