durian


durian
/door"ee euhn, -ahn'/, n.
1. the edible fruit of a tree, Durio zibethinus, of the bombax family, of southeastern Asia, having a hard, prickly rind, a highly flavored, pulpy flesh, and an unpleasant odor.
2. the tree itself.
Also, durion.
[1580-90; < Malay: a fruit with spiky skin, equiv. to duri thorn + -an nominalizer suffix]

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Tree (Durio zibethinus) of the bombax family (Bombacaceae) and its fruit, cultivated in Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, and southern Thailand.

The tree has oblong, tapering leaves and yellowish green flowers and resembles the elm in shape. The spherical fruit has a hard spiny shell and contains five oval compartments, each filled with an edible, cream-coloured, custardlike pulp, in which are embedded one to five chestnut-sized seeds, which are edible if roasted. The ripe fruits are eaten by many animals. Though the durian has a mild, sweet flavour, it also has a pungent foul odour. It is seldom exported.

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▪ tree and fruit
      (Durio zibethinus), tree of the hibiscus, or mallow, family (Malvaceae (Bombacaceae)) and its fruit. The durian is cultivated in Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, and southern Thailand. The tree has oblong, tapering leaves, rounded at the base, and yellowish green flowers borne along the older branches. Its shape resembles an elm.

      The fruit is spherical and 15 to 20 cm (6 to 8 inches) in diameter. It has a hard external husk, or shell, covered with stout spines, and contains five oval compartments, each filled with a cream-coloured, custard-like pulp, in which are embedded from one to five chestnut-sized seeds.

      The pulp is edible, and the seeds may be eaten if roasted. The ripe fruits are eaten by many animals. Although the durian has a mild, sweet flavour, it also has a pungent odour, which has been compared to that of Limburger cheese. It is seldom exported.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • durian — [ dʊərɪən] noun 1》 a spiny oval tropical fruit containing a creamy pulp with a fetid smell but agreeable taste. 2》 (also durian tree) the large Malaysian tree that bears durians. [Durio zibethinus.] Origin C16: from Malay durian, from duri thorn …   English new terms dictionary

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