drive


drive
drivable, driveable, adj.
/druyv/, v., drove or (Archaic) drave, driven, driving, n., adj.
v.t.
1. to send, expel, or otherwise cause to move by force or compulsion: to drive away the flies; to drive back an attacking army; to drive a person to desperation.
2. to cause and guide the movement of (a vehicle, an animal, etc.): to drive a car; to drive a mule.
3. to convey in a vehicle: She drove them to the station.
4. to force to work or act: He drove the workers until they collapsed.
5. to impel; constrain; urge; compel.
6. to carry (business, an agreement, etc.) vigorously through: He drove a hard bargain.
7. to keep (machinery) going.
8. Baseball.
a. to cause the advance of (a base runner) by a base hit or sacrifice fly: He drove him home with a scratch single.
b. to cause (a run) to be scored by a base hit or sacrifice fly: He drove in two runs.
9. Golf. to hit (a golf ball), esp. from the tee, as with a driver or driving iron: She drove the ball within ten feet of the pin.
10. Sports.
a. to hit or propel (a ball, puck, shuttlecock, etc.) very hard.
b. to kick (a ball) with much force.
11. Hunting.
a. to chase (game).
b. to search (a district) for game.
12. to float (logs) down a river or stream.
13. (in mining, construction, etc.) to excavate (a mine or tunnel heading).
v.i.
14. to cause and guide the movement of a vehicle or animal, esp. to operate an automobile.
15. to go or travel in a driven vehicle: He drives to work with me.
16. Golf. to hit a golf ball, esp. from the tee, as with a driver or driving iron: He drove long and straight throughout the match.
17. to strive vigorously toward a goal or objective; to work, play, or try wholeheartedly and with determination.
18. to go along before an impelling force; be impelled: The ship drove before the wind.
19. to rush or dash violently.
20. drive at, to attempt or intend to convey; allude to; suggest: What are you driving at?
21. let drive, to aim a blow or missile at; attack: He let drive at his pursuers.
n.
22. the act of driving.
23. a trip in a vehicle, esp. a short pleasure trip: a Sunday drive in the country.
24. an impelling along, as of game, cattle, or floating logs, in a particular direction.
25. the animals, logs, etc., thus driven.
26. Psychol. an inner urge that stimulates activity or inhibition; a basic or instinctive need: the hunger drive; sex drive.
27. a vigorous onset or onward course toward a goal or objective: the drive toward the goal line.
28. a strong military offensive.
29. a united effort to accomplish some specific purpose, esp. to raise money, as for a charity.
30. energy and initiative: a person with great drive.
31. vigorous pressure or effort, as in business.
32. a road for vehicles, esp. a scenic one, as in or along a park, or a short one, as an approach to a house.
33. Mach. a driving mechanism, as of an automobile: gear drive; chain drive.
34. Auto. the point or points of power application to the roadway: front-wheel drive; four-wheel drive.
35. Sports.
a. an act or instance of driving a ball, puck, shuttlecock, or the like.
b. the flight of such a ball, puck, shuttlecock, or the like, that has been driven with much force.
36. Golf. a shot, esp. with a driver or driving iron from the tee, that is intended to carry a great distance.
37. a hunt in which game is driven toward stationary hunters.
38. Electronics. excitation (def. 5).
adj.
39. noting or pertaining to a part of a machine or vehicle used for its propulsion.
[bef. 900; ME driven, OE drifan; c. D drijven, ON drifa, Goth dreiban, G treiben]
Syn. 1. push, force. 2, 15. DRIVE, RIDE are used interchangeably to mean traveling in an automobile or, formerly, in a horse-drawn vehicle. These two words are not synonyms in other connections. To DRIVE is to maneuver, guide, or steer the progress of a vehicle, animal, etc.: to drive a bus, a horse. To RIDE is to be carried about by an animal or be carried as a passenger in a vehicle: to ride a horse, a train, a bus. 30. push; ambition, motivation.

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In psychology, an urgent need pressing for satisfaction, usually rooted in some physiological deficiency or imbalance (e.g., hunger and thirst) and impelling the organism to action.

Psychologists distinguish between drives that are innate and directly related to basic physiological needs (e.g., food, air, and water) and drives that are learned (e.g., drug addiction). Among the other drives psychologists have identified are achievement, affection, affiliation, exploration, manipulation, maternity, pain avoidance, sex, and sleep.

* * *

      in psychology, an urgent basic need pressing for satisfaction, usually rooted in some physiological tension, deficiency, or imbalance (e.g., hunger and thirst) and impelling the organism to action. Some researchers have used the term need synonymously, although others distinguish between need as the deprived state and drive as its psychological manifestations (e.g., tension and restless or goal-directed activity). Psychologists also distinguish between drives that are innate and directly related to basic physiological needs (e.g., food, air, and water) and drives that are learned (e.g., drug addiction). Among the other drives or needs that have been proposed are achievement, activity, affection, affiliation, curiosity, elimination, exploration, manipulation, maternity, pain avoidance, sex, and sleep.

      In the 1940s U.S. psychologist Clark Hull proposed a drive-reduction theory of learning. In its simplest form, the theory claimed that no learning occurred unless a drive produced tension and impelled the organism into activity to procure a reward that would reduce the drive and satisfy its related physiological need. Later research suggests, however, that learning may also occur in the absence of any drive. See also motivation.

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Universalium. 2010.

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