diary


diary
/duy"euh ree/, n., pl. diaries.
1. a daily record, usually private, esp. of the writer's own experiences, observations, feelings, attitudes, etc.
2. a book for keeping such a record.
3. a book or pad containing pages marked and arranged in calendar order, in which to note appointments and the like.
[1575-85; < L diarium daily allowance, journal, equiv. to di(es) day + -arium -ARY]
Syn. 1, 2. journal, daybook, log, chronicle.

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I

Record of events, transactions, or observations kept daily or at frequent intervals; especially a daily record of personal activities, reflections, or feelings.

Written primarily for the writer's use alone, the personal diary usually offers a frankness not found in writing done for publication. The diary form, which began to flower in the late Renaissance, is important as a record of social and political history. The most famous diary in English is that of Samuel Pepys. Other notable journals include those of John Evelyn, Jonathan Swift, Fanny Burney, James Boswell, André Gide, and Virginia Woolf.
II
(as used in expressions)
Atlanta Journal Constitution
Ladies' Home Journal
Wall Street Journal The

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      form of autobiographical writing, a regularly kept record of the diarist's activities and reflections. Written primarily for the writer's use alone, the diary has a frankness that is unlike writing done for publication. Its ancient lineage is indicated by the existence of the term in Latin, diarium, itself derived from dies (“day”).

      The diary form began to flower in the late Renaissance, when the importance of the individual began to be stressed. In addition to their revelation of the diarist's personality, diaries have been of immense importance for the recording of social and political history. Journal d'un bourgeois de Paris, kept by an anonymous French priest from 1409 to 1431 and continued by another hand to 1449, for example, is invaluable to the historian of the reigns of Charles VI and Charles VII. The same kind of attention to historical events characterizes Memorials of the English Affairs by the lawyer and parliamentarian Bulstrode Whitelocke (1605–75) and the diary of the French Marquis de Dangeau (1638–1720), which spans the years 1684 to his death. The English diarist John Evelyn is surpassed only by the greatest diarist of all, Samuel Pepys (Pepys, Samuel), whose diary from Jan. 1, 1660 to May 31, 1669, gives both an astonishingly frank picture of his foibles and frailties and a stunning picture of life in London, at the court and the theatre, in his own household, and in his Navy office.

      In the 18th century, a diary of extraordinary emotional interest was kept by Jonathan Swift (Swift, Jonathan) and sent to Ireland as The Journal to Stella (written 1710–13; published 1766–68). This work is a surprising amalgam of ambition, affection, wit, and freakishness. The most notable English diary of the late 18th century was that of the novelist Fanny Burney (Burney, Fanny) (Madame d'Arblay); it was published in 1842–46. James Boswell's (Boswell, James) Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides (1785), a genuine diary though somewhat expanded, was one of the first to be published in its author's lifetime.

      Interest in the diary increased greatly in the first part of the 19th century, in which period many of the great diaries, including Pepys's, were first published. Those of unusual literary interest include the Journal of Sir Walter Scott (published in 1890); the Journals of Dorothy Wordsworth (published after her death in 1855), which show her influence on her brother William; and the diary of Henry Crabb Robinson (1775–1867), published in 1869, with much biographical material on his literary acquaintances, including Goethe, Schiller, Wordsworth, and Coleridge. The posthumous publication of the diaries of the Russian artist Marie Bashkirtseff (1860–84) produced a great sensation in 1887, as did the publication of the diary of the Goncourt brothers, beginning in 1888.

      In the 20th century, the Journal of Katherine Mansfield (1927), the two-volume Journal of André Gide (1939, 1954), and the five-volume Diary of Virginia Woolf (1977–84) are among the most notable examples.

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Universalium. 2010.

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