dermatomyositis


dermatomyositis
/deuhr mat'euh muy'euh suy"tis, derr"meuh toh-/, n. Pathol.
an inflammatory disease of connective tissues, manifested by skin inflammation and muscle weakness.
[1895-1900; DERMATO- + myositis inflammation of muscle tissue, irreg. < Gk myós (gen. of mys MUSCLE, mouse) + -ITIS]

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      chronic progressive inflammation of the skin and muscles, particularly the muscles of the shoulders and pelvis.

      Dermatomyositis occurs in both children (some of whom recover in about two years) and adults. The disease is more common in women. In most cases the first symptom of dermatomyositis is a skin rash, which appears in a variety of forms. A reddish violet rash commonly appears on the upper eyelids with swelling of the skin around the eyes. A rash sometimes also appears on the cheeks, neck, shoulders, forehead, trunk, and elbows, as well as across the joints of the fingers and toes. Other symptoms include muscle weakness and pain. The muscles commonly affected are those of the neck, pharynx, and torso. Calcium deposits often develop in affected skin and muscles, and this calcification of tissues can be very disabling. Dermatomyositis in adults is associated with a higher incidence of certain cancers, including malignancies of the lung, breast, and gastrointestinal tract.

      The characteristic muscular inflammation of dermatomyositis is similar to that seen in the related disorder polymyositis. In both diseases it is believed to result from destruction of cells caused by an autoimmune (autoimmunity) reaction—i.e., the reaction of the immune system against the body's own cells—but the particular mechanisms responsible for the tissue injury of dermatomyositis are thought to differ from those that give rise to polymyositis.

      Corticosteroids, such as prednisone, are the most common treatment for dermatomyositis. Immunoglobulins (antibody) and immunosuppressive drugs such as methotrexate also are used.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Dermatomyositis — Klassifikation nach ICD 10 M33.0 Juvenile Dermatomyositis M33.1 Sonstige Dermatomyositis …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Dermatomyositis — A chronic inflammatory disease of skin and muscle which is associated with patches of slightly raised reddish or scaly rash. The rash can be on the bridge of the nose, around the eyes, or on sun exposed areas of the neck and chest. Classically,… …   Medical dictionary

  • dermatomyositis — n. an inflammatory disorder of the skin and underlying tissues, including the muscles (in the absence of a rash it is known as polymyositis). The condition is one of the connective tissue diseases. A bluish red skin eruption occurs on the face,… …   The new mediacal dictionary

  • dermatomyositis — noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1899 an inflammatory disease of skin and muscle marked especially by muscular weakness and skin rash …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • dermatomyositis — noun A disease of connective tissue, related to polymyositis, characterized by inflammation of the muscles and skin …   Wiktionary

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  • Dermatomyositis — Der|ma|to|my|o|si|tis die; , ...itiden: Muskelentzündung in Verbindung mit einer Entzündung der Haut (Med.) …   Das große Fremdwörterbuch

  • dermatomyositis — [ˌdə:mətə(ʊ)mʌɪə(ʊ) sʌɪtɪs] noun Medicine inflammation of the skin and underlying muscle tissue …   English new terms dictionary


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