Deimos


Deimos
/duy"mos/, n.
1. an ancient Greek personification of terror, a son of Ares and Aphrodite.
2. Astron. one of the two moons of Mars.

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 the outer and smaller of Mars's two moons. It was discovered telescopically with its companion moon, Phobos, by the American astronomer Asaph Hall (Hall, Asaph) in 1877 and named for one of the sons of Ares, the Greek counterpart of the Roman god Mars. Deimos is an irregular rocky object having a cratered surface covered with a thick layer of fine debris.

      Roughly ellipsoidal in shape, Deimos measures about 15 km (9 miles) in its longest dimension. It revolves once around Mars every 30 hours 18 minutes at a mean distance of 23,459 km (14,577 miles) in a circular orbit that lies within 2° of Mars's equatorial plane. The satellite's long axis is always directed toward Mars; as with Earth's Moon, it has a rotational period equal to its orbital period and so keeps the same face to the planet.

      In spite of its tiny gravity, only about a thousandth that of Earth, Deimos has retained considerable amounts of fine regolith (unconsolidated rocky debris) on its surface. It thus appears smoother than Phobos because its craters lie partially buried under this loose material. The largest crater, located near the satellite's south pole, is about 2.5 km (1.6 miles) wide. The surface of Deimos is gray and very dark; its reflectance is only 7 percent—about half that of the Moon's surface. This fact and the satellite's low mean density (less than two grams per cubic centimetre) indicate a carbonaceous composition and suggest that Deimos may be a captured asteroid-like (asteroid) object.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Deimos — Deimos, a Greek word for dread, may refer to: Deimos (mythology), one of the sons of Ares and Aphrodite in Greek mythology Deimos (moon), the smaller and outermost of Mars two natural satellites Deimos (comics), villain for the Warlord comic… …   Wikipedia

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  • Deimos — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda El término Deimos puede hacer referencia a : Deimos, personificación del miedo según la mitología griega. El satélite Deimos del planeta Marte, nombrado así por el anterior. La empresa con sede en Boecillo,… …   Wikipedia Español

  • Deimos-1 — Spain DMC 1 Производитель …   Википедия

  • Deimos — Déimos Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. Déimos, dans la mythologie grecque, fils d Arès et d Aphrodite et frère de Phobos ; Déimos, un des deux satellites naturels de la planète Mars …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Deimos — (v. griech. Δεῖμος „Schrecken“) hat folgende Bedeutungen: In der griechischen Mythologie war Deimos der Bruder von Phobos, siehe Deimos (Mythologie) Nach ihm benannter Mond des Planeten Mars, siehe Deimos (Mond) …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Deimos — ☆ Deimos [dī′məs, dā′məs] n. [Gr deimos, lit., panic, personified as an attendant of Ares: see DIRE ] the smaller of the two satellites of Mars: cf. PHOBOS …   English World dictionary

  • Deimos — (lat. Formido), Personification des Grauens, bei Dichtern Sohn des Ares, s.d …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Deimos — Deimos,   1) ein Mond des Planeten Mars.    2) griechischer Mythos: die Personifikation des Schreckens, Begleiter des Kriegsgottes Ares …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Deimos — {{Deimos}} »Schrecken«, ein Sohn des Ares* von Aphrodite*, mit seinem Bruder Phobos (»Furcht«) ein Begleiter des Kriegsgotts …   Who's who in der antiken Mythologie


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