deer


deer
/dear/, n., pl. deer, (occasionally) deers.
1. any of several ruminants of the family Cervidae, most of the males of which have solid, deciduous antlers.
2. any of the smaller species of this family, as distinguished from the moose, elk, etc.
[bef. 900; ME der, OE deor beast; akin to Goth dius beast, OHG tior]

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I
Any of the ruminants in the family Cervidae, which have two large and two small hooves on each foot and antlers on the males of most species and on the females of some species.

Deer live mainly in forests but may be found in deserts, tundra, and swamps and on high mountainsides. They are native to Europe, Asia, North America, South America, and northern Africa and have been introduced widely elsewhere. Females are usually called does, and males bucks. Deer range in shoulder height from the 12-in. (30-cm) pudu (genus Pudu) to the 6.5-ft (2-m) moose. They typically have a compact body, short tail, and long, slender ears. They shed their antlers each year, and new ones grow in. The general form of the antler varies among species. Deer feed on grass, twigs, bark, and shoots. They are hunted for their meat, hides, and antlers. See also caribou, elk, mule deer, muntjac, red deer, roe deer, white-tailed deer.

Rival European red deer stags (Cervus elaphus) fighting for possession of a hind in the ...

Stefan Meyers GDT/Ardea London
II
(as used in expressions)
white tailed deer

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mammal
Introduction
  any of 43 species of hoofed ruminants (ruminant) in the order Artiodactyla (artiodactyl), notable for having two large and two small hooves on each foot and also for having antlers in the males of most species and in the females of one species. Deer are native to all continents except Australia and Antarctica, and many species have been widely introduced beyond their original habitats as game animals. One species, the reindeer (also known as the caribou), has been domesticated. Some swamp and island species are endangered, but most continental species are flourishing under protection and good management. Deer, when granted some protection, readily exploit man-made disturbances caused by agriculture, forestry, and urbanization. white-tailed deer, normally a cherished North American game animal, have even become pests in suburbs and cities in the United States and Canada.

      The word deer has been applied at times to species that are not cervids, such as the musk deer (Moschus) and mouse deer (Tragulus). However, the former is now placed in a separate family (Moschidae), while mouse deer are actually primitive ruminants of the family Tragulidae. With these exclusions, Cervidae becomes the deer family, a consistent, natural grouping of species.

Morphology and behaviour
 In all but one species of deer, males carry antlers; in the reindeer (Rangifer tarandus), both sexes carry antlers. The single antlerless form, the Chinese water deer (Hydropotes inermis), reflects an earlier pre-antler condition, as is shown by the fossil record. In this primitive condition males have long, sharp upper canines, called tusks, that are used for slashing and stabbing in territorial contests. Some species carry both antlers and tusks and show a progression of increased antler size and complexity with decreased size and functional structure of the tusks. ( musk deer resemble primitive deer in that males are armed with tusks.)

      Deer have several other distinguishing characteristics. All deer lack the gall bladder. Females have four teats. Deer may have scent glands on their legs (metatarsal, tarsal, and pedal glands), but they do not have rectal, vulval, or preputal glands.

 Deer are specialized herbivores, as is reflected in their large and anatomically complex digestive organs, their mobile lips, and the size and complexity of their teeth. However, deer rely little on coarse-fibred grasses, and they have not evolved grazing specializations comparable to those found in bovids (bovid). Instead, they are highly selective feeders (feeding behaviour) on young grasses, herbs, lichens, foliage, buds, aquatic plants, woody shoots, fruit, and natural ensilage—that is, plant food characterized by low fibre but high protein content, toxicity, and digestibility.

  The bias of deer toward high-quality food has its origin in the very high demands of antler growth for minerals, protein, and energy. Antlers are “bone horns” that are grown and shed annually. The growing antlers are encased in “velvet,” a highly vascularized, nerve-filled skin covered by short, soft hairs. The blood-engorged, growing antlers are warm to the touch and quite sensitive. Depending on the species, they take up to 150 days to grow, after which the velvet dies and is forcefully removed by rubbing the antlers against branches and small trees. Along with some blood residue, this imparts a brownish colour to the otherwise white antler bone. Antlers finish growing before the mating season and are used as weapons and shields in combat or as display organs in courtship. Normally shed after the mating season, antlers may be retained in some territorial tropical deer for more than a year. The relative demand for energy and nutrients declines with body size but increases exponentially for antler growth. Therefore, large-bodied species require more nutrients and energy to grow antlers than do small-bodied species. These requirements cannot be obtained from grasses but only from nutrient-rich dicotyledonous plants.

      The requirement for nutrients and energy has severe repercussions on the ecology of deer. It confines deer to relatively productive habitats, excluding them from deserts, dry grasslands, and geologically old landscapes leached of nutrients. Moreover, it severely limits the abundance of Cervidae in mature, species-rich faunas in which many herbivore species compete for food. In order to meet their high nutrient demands, deer are specialized to exploit disturbed ecosystems. For instance, after a forest fire, an area normally passes through several ecological plant successions within a few decades before the original conditions are restored. Early plant successions normally contain an abundance of the type of plant food required by deer. Some disturbances, such as river flooding and the rise and fall of lake levels, occur annually and create local, perpetually immature, nutrient-rich ecosystems. Since disturbances such as wildfires, storm floods, avalanches, or wind-felled trees are unpredictable, deer have evolved great abilities to quickly find and colonize such transient habitats. For example, the severe ecological upheaval caused by the extreme climatic oscillations of the Ice Ages greatly favoured deer. Glaciers ground rock into highly fertile waterborne silt and wind-borne loess that refertilized landscapes and rejuvenated the soil. Extinctions swept away warm-climate competitors. From the tropics deer spread to colder and more seasonal landscapes, including the Alps and the Arctic. Like other families of large mammals that colonized extreme Ice Age environments, deer diversified and evolved into grotesque giants that had ornate coat patterns and large, bizarre antlers, which could grow only from nutrient-rich soils.

      While deer tend to have broad, somewhat similar food habits, they are highly divergent in their antipredator strategies (predation). This divergence segregates species ecologically and thus minimizes potential food competition between species sharing the same space. A deer species that hides and, if discovered, departs in rapid jumps to hide again requires forests and thickets, while a highly specialized runner needs flat, unobstructed terrain to outrun predators. Specialized jumpers may choose to stay close to steep slopes and rugged terrain and thus avoid areas frequented by species that run and jump, while cliff climbers may exploit gradients and altitudes closed to others.

Old and New World deer
      The family Cervidae divides into two fairly distinct groups, the Old World deer (subfamily Cervinae) and the New World deer (subfamily Capreolinae). This division reflects where the deer originally evolved; however, now it is not a geographical distinction but instead derives from their different foot structures. In the Old World deer the second and fifth hand bones (metapodia) have almost completely disappeared except for proximal, terminal remnants. In the New World deer the remnants are distal.

Old World deer
 The Old World deer include the 11 species of tropical Asian muntjacs (muntjac) (genus Muntiacus), the most primitive deer; males bear tusks and antlers on tall antler pedicles. The next evolutionary step is represented by tropical and subtropical deer that have a basic three-pronged antler plan. They include giants such as the sambar of India (Cervus unicolor); three species of large swamp deer of India and Southeast Asia, namely the barasingha (C. duvaucelii), Eld's deer (C. eldii), and the now-extinct Schomburgk's deer (C. schomburgki); the gregarious chital (Axis axis) of India and Sri Lanka and Timor deer (C. timorensis) of Indonesia; the small hog deer (A. porcinus) of India; and a plethora of small island species, including the Bawean deer (A. kuhlii) of Indonesia and the Calamian deer (A. calamianensis), Visayan deer (C. alfredi), and Philippine brown deer (C. mariannus), all three of the Philippines. In these species one sees the same basic “deer design” diversified into a large number of ecological niches.

      Old World deer with a basic four-pronged antler structure occupy temperate zones. These include the sika (C. nippon) of Japan and the fallow deer (Dama dama) of Asia Minor. The sika stands at the base of a great radiation of species that led to the red deer (C. elaphus) and elk (C. elaphus canadensis), the great cold-adapted deer of Eurasia and North America sporting five- and six-pronged antlers. The fallow deer is the last survivor of a radiation of giant Pleistocene (Pleistocene Epoch) deer, the most spectacular of which was the Irish elk (Megaloceros), which weighed 600 kg (1,300 pounds) and whose antlers spread up to 4 metres (14 feet) in width. The white-lipped deer (C. albirostris) of the Tibetan Plateau and Père David's deer (Elaphurus davidianus) of the swamps along China's major rivers complete the category of Old World deer.

New World deer
  The New World deer came from a separate radiation that colonized North and South America and Eurasia. Among the grotesque giants that evolved in the Ice Age are the moose (Alces alces), the largest of all deer, standing 2 metres (7 feet) or more at the shoulder, and the reindeer, the most plains-adapted runner among deer with relatively large antlers. Also cold-adapted are the tiny Eurasian roe deer (Capreolus species) and the small, antlerless Chinese water deer of Korea and China. In the Americas the white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) colonized both continents. Its closest relative, the mule deer (O. hemionus), occupies western North America. Dwarf brocket deer (genus Mazama) are found southward from Mexico into Argentina. Two species of the tiniest deer, the pudu (genus Pudu), standing only 30 cm (12 inches) at the shoulder, live far apart in the central Andes and southern Chile, as do two species of the larger, rock-climbing Andean deer (genus Hippocamelus). The small pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus) and the red deer-sized marsh deer (Blastocerus dichotomus), both of South America, are endangered.

Valerius Geist

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Deer — (d[=e]r), n. sing. & pl. [OE. der, deor, animal, wild animal, AS. de[ o]r; akin to D. dier, OFries. diar, G. thier, tier, Icel. d[=y]r, Dan. dyr, Sw. djur, Goth. dius; of unknown origin. [root]71.] 1. Any animal; especially, a wild animal. [Obs.] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • deer — (dîr) n. pl. deer ▸ Any of various hoofed ruminant mammals of the family Cervidae, characteristically having deciduous antlers borne chiefly by the males. The deer family includes the white tailed deer, elk, moose, and caribou. ╂ [Middle English… …   Word Histories

  • Deer — heißen: Deer (Arkansas), Vereinigten Staaten Deer (Missouri), Vereinigten Staaten Deer (New Mexico), Vereinigten Staaten Deér, namentlich: Josef Deér (József, 1905–1972), ungarischer Historiker Siehe auch: John Deere, Landmaschinenhersteller… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • deer — [ dır ] (plural deer or deers) noun count * a large brown animal with long thin legs. The adult male deer is called a stag and may have antlers growing from its head. The female deer is called a doe and a young deer is called a fawn …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • deer — O.E. deor animal, beast, from P.Gmc. *deuzam, the general Germanic word for animal (as opposed to man), but often restricted to wild animal (Cf. O.Fris. diar, Du. dier, O.N. dyr, O.H.G. tior, Ger. Tier animal, Goth. dius wild animal, also Cf. R …   Etymology dictionary

  • deer — [dir] n. pl. deer or deers [ME der < OE deor, wild animal, akin to Ger tier, ON dȳr < IE base * dhewes, *dheus , to stir up, blow, breathe (> DUSK, DOZE1, FURY): for sense development cf. ANIMAL] 1. any of a family (Cervidae) of… …   English World dictionary

  • deer — [dıə US dır] n plural deer ↑antler [: Old English; Origin: deor animal ] a large wild animal that can run very fast, eats grass, and has horns …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • deer — ► NOUN (pl. same) ▪ a hoofed grazing or browsing animal, the male of which usually has branched bony antlers that are shed annually. ORIGIN Old English, originally also denoting any quadruped …   English terms dictionary

  • Deer — This article is about the ruminant animal. For other uses, see Deer (disambiguation). Fawn and Stag redirect here. For other uses, see Fawn (disambiguation) and Stag (disambiguation). Deer Temporal range: Early Oligocene–Recent …   Wikipedia

  • Deér — Josef Deér (auch: József Deér) (* 4. März 1905 in Budapest; † 26. September 1972 in Bern) war ein ungarischer Historiker. Der Sohn eines Apothekers und einer Lehrerin studierte von 1923 bis 1929 an den Universitäten Budapest und Wien Geschichte.… …   Deutsch Wikipedia


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