Cape buffalo
a large black buffalo, Syncerus caffer, of southern Africa, having horns that meet at the base forming a helmetlike structure over the forehead.
[1885-90]

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Massive, black, horned buffalo (Syncerus caffer), formerly found throughout sub-Saharan Africa but now greatly reduced in number by disease and hunting.

It is a gregarious animal of open or scrub-covered plains and open forests. When wounded, it is regarded as one of the most dangerous animals. It stands up to 5 ft (1.5 m) tall at the shoulder, and bulls can weigh almost a ton (about 900 kg). Its heavy horns typically curve downward, then up and inward. A smaller subspecies is found in dense West African forests.

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mammal
also called  African buffalo 
 the largest and most formidable of Africa's wild bovids (bovid) (family Bovidae) and a familiar sight to visitors of African parks and reserves. The Cape buffalo is the only member of the buffalo and cattle tribe (Bovini) that occurs naturally in Africa. (The forest, or red, buffalo, S. caffer nanus, a much smaller and less familiar subspecies, inhabits forests and swamps of Central and West Africa.)

 The Cape buffalo is not very tall—it stands only 130–150 cm (51–59 inches) tall and has relatively short legs—but it is massive, weighing 425–870 kg (935–1,910 pounds). Bulls are about 100 kg (220 pounds) heavier than cows, and their horns are thicker and usually wider, up to 100 cm (40 inches) across, with a broad shield (only fully developed at seven years) covering the forehead. The coat is thin and black, except in young calves, whose coats may be either black or brown.

 One of the most successful of Africa's wild ruminants (ruminant), the Cape buffalo thrives in virtually all types of grassland habitat in sub-Saharan Africa, from dry savanna to swamp and from lowland floodplains to montane mixed forest and glades, as long as it is within commuting distance of water (up to 20 km [12 miles]). It is immune to some diseases that afflict domestic cattle in Africa—in particular, the bovine sleeping sickness (nagana) transmitted by tsetse flies (tsetse fly). However, the Cape buffalo is susceptible to cattle-borne diseases. In the 1890s a rinderpest plague swept the African continent from Ethiopia to the Cape of Good Hope and killed up to 90 percent of the buffalo, as well as many antelopes (antelope). Although buffalo populations recovered over the next decades, they have continued to suffer from periodic outbreaks of rinderpest, foot-and-mouth (foot-and-mouth disease), and other diseases to which both buffalo and cattle are susceptible, while at the same time they have had to compete with ever-increasing numbers of cattle for essentially the same feeding niche as bulk grazers.

      To sustain its bulk, the Cape buffalo must eat a lot of grass, and therefore it depends more on quantity than quality. It is able to digest taller and coarser grass than most other ruminants, has a wide muzzle and a row of incisor teeth that enable it to take big bites, and can use the tongue to bundle grass before cropping it—all bovine traits. When grass is scarce or of too poor quality, buffaloes will browse woody vegetation. Their preferred habitat includes refuge from heat and danger in the form of woodland, thickets, or reeds, pastures with medium to tall grass (preferably but not necessarily green), and access to water, wallows, and mineral licks. The largest populations occur in well-watered savannas, notably on floodplains bordering major rivers and lakes, where herds of over 1,000 are not uncommon. On a floodplain in Zambia's (Zambia) Kafue National Park, the average herd was 450, with a range from 19 to 2,075.

      Extremely gregarious, buffaloes are one of the few African ruminants that lie touching. Herds include both sexes and live in traditional, exclusive home ranges. Clans of related females and offspring associate in subgroups. A male dominance hierarchy determines which bulls breed. All-male herds are predominately old and sedentary, as are lone bulls. Calves are born year-round, after a nine-month gestation. Though weeks pass before calves can keep up with a fleeing herd, they do not go through a hiding stage but follow under their mothers' protection as soon as they can stand. Herds also cooperatively defend members; they put to flight and even kill lions (lion) when aroused by distress calls.

Richard Estes
 

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Cape buffalo — Cape Cape (k[=a]p), n. [F. cap, fr. It. capo head, cape, fr. L. caput heat, end, point. See {Chief}.] A piece or point of land, extending beyond the adjacent coast into the sea or a lake; a promontory; a headland. [1913 Webster] {Cape buffalo}… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cape buffalo — Buffalo Buf fa*lo, n.; pl. {Buffaloes}. [Sp. bufalo (cf. It. bufalo, F. buffle), fr. L. bubalus, bufalus, a kind of African stag or gazelle; also, the buffalo or wild ox, fr. Gr. ? buffalo, prob. fr. ? ox. See {Cow} the animal, and cf. {Buff} the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Cape buffalo — n. a large, black, nearly hairless, very fierce buffalo (Syncerus caffer) of South Africa, with horns joined at the bases to form a helmetlike structure …   English World dictionary

  • Cape buffalo — afrikinis buivolas statusas T sritis zoologija | vardynas taksono rangas rūšis atitikmenys: lot. Syncerus caffer angl. African buffalo; Cape buffalo vok. afrikanischer Büffel; Kaffernbüffel; Steppenbüffel rus. африканский буйвол; ёрный буйвол… …   Žinduolių pavadinimų žodynas

  • Cape buffalo — Cape′ buf falo n. mam African buffalo • Etymology: 1885–90 …   From formal English to slang

  • Cape buffalo — noun Etymology: Cape of Good Hope, Africa Date: 1860 the large reddish brown to black wild buffalo (Syncerus caffer) of sub Saharan Africa called also African buffalo …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Cape buffalo — /ˈkeɪp bʌfəloʊ/ (say kayp bufuhloh) noun a large, short haired buffalo, Syncerus caffer, of southern Africa, having massive curved horns; the only species of buffalo native to the African continent. Also, African buffalo …   Australian English dictionary

  • Cape buffalo — noun large often savage buffalo of southern Africa having upward curving horns; mostly in game reserves • Syn: ↑Synercus caffer • Hypernyms: ↑Old World buffalo, ↑buffalo • Member Holonyms: ↑Synercus, ↑genus Synercus, ↑ …   Useful english dictionary

  • Cape buffalo — noun A large African bovid, Syncerus caffer. Syn: African buffalo …   Wiktionary

  • Cape — (k[=a]p), n. [F. cap, fr. It. capo head, cape, fr. L. caput heat, end, point. See {Chief}.] A piece or point of land, extending beyond the adjacent coast into the sea or a lake; a promontory; a headland. [1913 Webster] {Cape buffalo} (Zo[ o]l.) a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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