child-directedspeech
child-di·rect·ed speech (chīldʹdĭ-rĕk'tĭd, -dī-) n.
Any of various speech patterns used by parents or caregivers when communicating with young children, particularly infants, usually involving simplified vocabulary, melodic pitch, repetitive questioning, and a slow or deliberate tempo.
 
Usage Note: Although motherese popularly describes the language patterns of mothers speaking to their infants, these patterns are not limited to them; therefore, child-language researchers often employ the term child-directed speech to include a wider range of speakers and addressees. Others use caregiver speech, which reflects a still wider range, or, less commonly, parentese.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”