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antibody

Translation
antibody
/an"ti bod'ee/, n., pl. antibodies.
1. any of numerous Y-shaped protein molecules produced by B cells as a primary immune defense, each molecule and its clones having a unique binding site that can combine with the complementary site of a foreign antigen, as on a virus or bacterium, thereby disabling the antigen and signaling other immune defenses. Abbr.: Ab
2. antibodies of a particular type collectively. Also called immunoglobulin.
[1895-1900; ANTI- + BODY]

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Molecule in the immune system that circulates in blood and lymph in response to invasion by an antigen.

Antibodies are globulins formed in lymphoid tissues by B cells, whose receptors are specialized to bind to a specific antigen. These receptors are copied as antibodies that attack the target antigens by binding to them, either neutralizing them or triggering a complement reaction. Antibodies have widely varying binding sites, providing protection from a wide range of infectious agents and toxic substances. Antibodies derived from the blood serum of infected people or animals are often given in an antiserum for quick immunization against fast-acting toxins or microbes. In 1975 César Milstein and colleagues developed a process for producing specific antibodies in virtually limitless amounts; these monoclonal antibodies can deliver radiation or drugs directly to specific antigens. See also antitoxin; reticuloendothelial system.

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also called  immunoglobulin 
 a protective protein produced by the immune system in response to the presence of a foreign substance, called an antigen. Antibodies recognize and latch onto antigens in order to remove them from the body. A wide range of substances are regarded by the body as antigens, including disease-causing organisms and toxic materials such as insect venom.

      When an alien substance enters the body, the immune system is able to recognize it as foreign because molecules on the surface of the antigen differ from those found in the body. To eliminate the invader, the immune system calls on a number of mechanisms, including one of the most important—antibody production. Antibodies are produced by specialized white blood cells called B lymphocytes (lymphocyte) or B cells (B cell). When an antigen binds to the B-cell surface, it stimulates the B cell to divide and mature into a group of identical cells called a clone. The mature B cells, called plasma cells, secrete millions of antibodies into the bloodstream and lymphatic system.

      As antibodies circulate, they attack and neutralize antigens that are identical to the one that triggered the immune response. Antibodies attack antigens by binding to them. The binding of an antibody to a toxin, for example, can neutralize the poison simply by changing its chemical composition; such antibodies are called antitoxins (antitoxin). By attaching themselves to some invading microbes, other antibodies can render such microorganisms immobile or prevent them from penetrating body cells. In other cases the antibody-coated antigen is subject to a chemical chain reaction with complement, which is a series of proteins found in the blood. The complement reaction either can trigger the lysis (bursting) of the invading microbe or can attract microbe-killing scavenger cells that ingest, or phagocytose (phagocytosis), the invader. Once begun, antibody production continues for several days until all antigen molecules are removed. Antibodies remain in circulation for several months, providing extended immunity against that particular antigen.

      B cells and antibodies together provide one of the most important functions of immunity, which is to recognize an invading antigen and to produce a tremendous number of protective proteins that scour the body to remove all traces of that antigen. Collectively B cells recognize an almost limitless number of antigens; however, individually each B cell can bind to only one type of antigen. B cells distinguish antigens through proteins, called antigen receptors, found on their surfaces. An antigen receptor is basically an antibody protein that is not secreted but is anchored to the B-cell membrane. All antigen receptors found on a particular B cell are identical, but receptors located on other B cells differ. Although their general structure is similar, the variation lies in the area that interacts with the antigen—the antigen-binding, or antibody-combining, site. This structural variation among antigen-binding sites allows different B cells to recognize different antigens. The antigen receptor does not actually recognize the entire antigen; instead it binds to only a portion of the antigen's surface, an area called the antigenic determinant or epitope. Binding between the receptor and epitope occurs only if their structures are complementary. If they are, epitope and receptor fit together like two pieces of a puzzle, an event that is necessary to activate B-cell production of antibodies.

 Each antibody molecule is essentially identical to the antigen receptor of the B cell that produced it. The basic structure of these proteins consists of two pairs of polypeptide chains (lengths of amino acids linked by peptide bonds) that form a flexible Y shape. The stem of the Y consists of one end of each of two identical heavy chains, while each arm is composed of the remaining portion of a heavy chain plus a smaller protein called the light chain. The two light chains also are identical. Within particular classes of antibodies the stem and the bottom of the arms are fairly similar and thus are called the constant region. The tips of the arms, however, are highly variable in sequence. It is these tips that bind antigen. Thus each antibody has two identical antigen-binding sites, one at the end of each arm, and the antigen-binding sites vary greatly among antibodies.

 Antibodies are grouped into five classes according to their constant region. Each class is designated by a letter attached to an abbreviation of the word immunoglobulin: IgG, IgM, IgA, IgD, and IgE. The classes of antibody differ not only in their constant region but also in activity. For example, IgG, the most common antibody, is present mostly in the blood and tissue fluids, while IgA is found in the mucous membranes lining the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts.

      Preformed antibodies, which are derived from the blood serum (serum) of previously infected people or animals, are often administered in an antiserum to another person in order to provide immediate, passive immunization against fast-acting toxins or microbes, such as those in snakebites or tetanus infections.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Antibody — An ti*bod y ([a^]n t[i^]*b[o^]d [y^]), n. 1. (Med., Physiol. Chem.) Any of various bodies or substances in the blood which act in antagonism to harmful foreign bodies, as toxins or the bacteria producing the toxins. Normal blood serum apparently… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • antibody — antibody. См. антитело. (Источник: «Англо русский толковый словарь генетических терминов». Арефьев В.А., Лисовенко Л.А., Москва: Изд во ВНИРО, 1995 г.) …   Молекулярная биология и генетика. Толковый словарь.

  • antibody — (n.) substance developed in blood as an antitoxin, 1901, a hybrid formed from ANTI (Cf. anti ) against + BODY (Cf. body). Probably a translation of Ger. Antikörper, condensed from a phrase such as anti toxisches Körper anti toxic body …   Etymology dictionary

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  • antibody — Synonyms and related words: Rh factor, Rh negative, Rh positive, Rh type, Rhesus factor, acquired immunity, active immunity, agglutinin, allergen, anaphylactin, antiantibody, antigen, antiserum, antitoxic serum, antitoxin, antivenin, arterial… …   Moby Thesaurus

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