Parliament, Admonition to

Parliament, Admonition to

▪ Puritan manifesto, 1572
      Puritan manifesto, published in 1572 and written by the London clergymen John Field and Thomas Wilcox, that demanded that Queen Elizabeth I restore the “purity” of New Testament worship in the Church of England and eliminate the remaining Roman Catholic elements and practices from the Church of England. Reflecting wide Presbyterian influence among Puritans, the admonition advocated greater direct reliance on the authority of the Scriptures and also church government by ministers and elders rather than by a higher order of clergy (bishops). The Queen, however, resisted this document. The authors were imprisoned and the leader of the Presbyterians, Thomas Cartwright, was forced to flee England after publishing “A Second Admonition to Parliament” in support of the first. The clergy who refused to conform to the compulsory form of worship that had been promulgated by Elizabeth in 1559 (as the Act of Uniformity) lost their pulpits or were imprisoned.

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