Mahler, Alma

▪ wife of Gustav Mahler
original name  Alma Maria Schindler,  also called  Alma Gropius and Alma Werfel  
born Aug. 31, 1879, Vienna, Austria-Hungary
died Dec. 11, 1964, New York, N.Y., U.S.

      wife of Gustav Mahler, known for her relationships with celebrated men.

      The daughter of the painter Emil Schindler, Alma grew up surrounded by art and artists. She studied art and became friends with the painter Gustav Klimt, who made several portraits of her. Her primary interest, however, was in music: she was a gifted pianist and studied musical composition with Alexander von Zemlinsky.

      In 1902 she married Gustav Mahler (Mahler, Gustav), who at first discouraged her from composing; he is said to have changed his mind after hearing her songs. Mahler left a musical portrait of her in the first movement of his Symphony No. 6, and he dedicated Symphony No. 8 to her. After his death in 1911 Alma had an affair with Oskar Kokoschka (Kokoschka, Oskar), who painted her many times, most notably in “The Tempest” (1914; “Die Windsbraut”). In 1915 she married the architect Walter Gropius (Gropius, Walter); they were divorced after World War I. She married the writer Franz Werfel (Werfel, Franz) in 1929. In the late 1930s the Werfels left Nazi Germany, eventually settling in the United States.

      During her lifetime Alma Mahler became friends with numerous celebrated artists, including the composer Arnold Schoenberg, the writer Gerhart Hauptmann, and the singer Enrico Caruso. The composer Alban Berg dedicated his opera Wozzeck (1921) to her.

      Alma Mahler published two collections of Gustav Mahler's letters as well as her memoirs, And the Bridge Is Love (1958). She also published a number of songs.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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