coffee production

▪ plant genus
      cultivation of the coffee plant, usually done in large commercial operations. The plant, a tropical evergreen shrub or small tree of African origin (genus Coffea, family Rubiaceae), is grown for its seeds, or beans, which are roasted, ground, and sold for brewing coffee. This section treats the cultivation of the coffee plant. For information on the processing of coffee and the history of its use, see the article coffee.

      The Arabica species of coffee is cultivated mostly in Latin America, while the Robusta species predominates in Africa. Both coffee species are grown in India, Indonesia, and other Asian countries. There are many varieties, forms, and types of each. The effects of environment and cultivation further increase this diversity.

      Climatic factors most important for coffee growth are temperature and rainfall. No variety can withstand a temperature in the vicinity of 32°F (0°C). Temperatures between 73° and 82° F (23° and 28° C) are the most favourable. Rainfall of 60 to 80 inches (1,500 to 2,000 millimetres) per year is required along with a dry period of two to three months for the Arabica. Irrigation is required where annual rainfall is less than 40 inches (1,000 millimetres).

      Plantations are usually established in cleared forestland. The young shrubs are planted in rows spaced so that the density varies between 500 and 750 plants per acre (1,200 and 1,800 plants per hectare). Seedlings or cuttings raised in nurseries are carefully planted at the beginning of the rainy season; until they start producing fruit three to four years later, their care is limited largely to the trimming required to give them a robust, balanced framework and to stimulate fruiting.

      For a long time coffee was cultivated in the shade. This is still done in many areas but is losing popularity because better results can be obtained without shade or with very light shade if other practices, such as trimming, weeding, and fertilization are followed. Yields as high as 2,000 to 3,000 pounds per acre (2,300 to 3,400 kilograms per hectare) can be grown, compared to 450 to 900 pounds per acre (500 to 1,000 kilograms per hectare) by traditional methods.

      Among the diseases of the coffee (coffee rust) shrub are leaf rust caused by the fungus Hemileia vastatrix, which does considerable damage in the plantations of Arabica, and the coffee berry disease caused by the fungus Colletotrichum coffeanum, which also attacks the Arabica. Robusta appears to be resistant, or only slightly susceptible, to these scourges. Among the numerous parasites that attack the coffee shrub is the berry borer (Stephanoderes hamjei), which damages the seeds of both Arabica and Robusta.

      The time between blooming and maturing of the fruit varies appreciably with the variety and the climate; for the Arabica it is about seven months, and for the Robusta, about nine months. The fruit is gathered by hand when it is fully ripe and red-purple in colour.

René Coste Ed.

Additional Reading
Sources include M.N. Clifford and K.C. Willson (eds.), Coffee: Botany, Biochemistry, and Production of Beans and Beverage (1985); and Gordon Wrigley, Coffee (1988). Ed.

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Universalium. 2010.

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