Solutrean industry

Solutrean industry
Short-lived stone-tool industry that flourished 17,000–21,000 years ago in southwestern France (e.g., at La Solutré and Laugerie-Haute) and in nearby areas.

The industry is of special interest because of its particularly fine workmanship. In addition to burins (chisel-like tools), scrapers, and borers, the Solutrean industry exhibits blades formed in the shape of laurel or willow leaves and various shouldered points. Some implements are so fine as to be useless as tools and may instead have been luxury items.

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▪ prehistoric technology
      short-lived style of toolmaking that flourished approximately 17,000 to 21,000 years ago in southwestern France (e.g., at Laugerie-Haute and La Solutré) and in nearby areas. The industry is of special interest because of its particularly fine workmanship. The Solutrean industry, like those of other late Paleolithic big-game hunters, contained a variety of tools such as burins (woodworking tools rather like chisels), scrapers, and borers; but blades that were formed in the shape of laurel or willow leaves and shouldered points are the implements that distinguish the Solutrean.

      In the early Solutrean, unifacial points (flaked on only one side) are common. In the middle Solutrean, these are gradually replaced by laurel-leaf blades and bifacial points. Tiny blunt-backed flint blades and scrapers and single-shouldered points also occur. Bizarre implements, with notches or asymmetrical shapes, appear; these and laurel-leaf blades so fine as to have precluded their use as tools suggest the production of fine-flaked implements for purposes of luxury alone. In the late Solutrean, the willow-leaf blade (slim, with rounded ends and retouching on one side only) of extremely fine workmanship made its appearance. Bone needles with eyes occur and indicate the use of fitted clothing, useful in a near-glacial climate. There is much evidence of the use of ornament: bracelets, bead necklaces, pendants, bone pins, and coloured pigments must have been used for personal adornment. Stone friezes, bas-reliefs, and paintings on stone plaques and cave walls are known. Even tool stone was chosen for its beauty; coloured quartz, jasper, and handsome flints abound.

      The origin of the Solutrean stoneworking technique is in some dispute. Most of the evidence indicates it was an invention indigenous to the Dordogne region of France, but some scholars attribute its swift appearance to the arrival of a new people and its equally swift disappearance to destruction of the Solutrean people by another group arriving with a different tool industry. The Solutrean follows the Perigordian and Aurignacian industries and is succeeded by the Magdalenian.

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Universalium. 2010.

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