hemlock
/hem"lok'/, n.
1. a poisonous plant, Conium maculatum, of the parsley family, having purple-spotted stems, finely divided leaves, and umbels of small white flowers, used medicinally as a powerful sedative.
2. a poisonous drink made from this plant.
3. any of various other plants, esp. of the genus Cicuta, as the water hemlock.
4. Also called hemlock spruce. any of several coniferous trees of the genus Tsuga, native to the U.S., characterized by a pyramidal manner of growth. Cf. eastern hemlock, western hemlock.
5. the soft, light wood of a hemlock tree, used in making paper, in the construction of buildings, etc.
[bef. 900; ME hemlok, humlok, OE hymlic, hemlic; perh. akin to OE hymele hop plant]

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Any of 10 species of coniferous evergreen trees that make up the genus Tsuga, in the pine family, native to North America and central and eastern Asia.

Some are important timber trees, and many are popular ornamentals. Other plants commonly called hemlock include ground hemlock (see yew) and poison hemlock and water hemlock (parsley family). A true hemlock is a tall, pyramidal tree with purplish or reddish-brown bark, slender horizontal or drooping branches, and short, blunt leaves that grow from woody cushionlike structures on the twigs.

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plant
 any of about 14 species of coniferous evergreen trees comprising the genus Tsuga of the family Pinaceae, native to North America and central and eastern Asia. Some are important timber trees, and many are popular ornamentals. Other plants commonly called hemlock include ground hemlock (see yew) and poison hemlock and water hemlock, plants of the family Apiaceae.

      A true hemlock is a tall, pyramidal tree with purplish or reddish brown bark, slender horizontal or drooping branches, and short, blunt leaves that grow from woody cushionlike structures on the twigs. The small cones hang from the branch tips and retain their scales when they fall. Each scale bears two winged seeds. The eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) of North America, also called Canadian hemlock and hemlock spruce, usually is 18 to 30 metres (about 60 to 100 feet) tall and has a trunk 1.2 metres (4 feet) in diameter. Its dark green leaves have grooves on the upper surface and two white bands on the lower surface. The bark contains tannin, used in the tanning industry; and the soft, coarse-grained, splintery wood is used in construction and in the manufacture of boxes. Many varieties are used in ornamental plantings. The western hemlock (T. heterophylla), also known as hemlock fir and Prince Albert's fir, is a timber tree often 60 metres (200 feet) tall, with a trunk 1.8 to 3 metres (6 to 10 feet) in diameter. Its wood is superior to that of all other hemlocks and compares favourably with that of pine and spruce. Siebold's hemlock (T. sieboldii) and the Japanese hemlock (T. diversifolia), both native to Japan, are grown as ornamentals in North America and Europe.

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Universalium. 2010.

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