deforcement
See deforce.

* * *

▪ English law
      in English property law, wrongful taking and possession of land belonging to another. Deforcement had its primary legal significance in feudal England. Deforcement arose particularly in cases in which land possessed by a tenant escheated (was forfeited) to his lord (either for reason of the tenant's wrongful act against the manor or for nonpayment of rent due the lord), in which the occurrence of some other event carried the penalty of forfeiture of the tenant's land to his lord, and in which the tenant or some other person wrongfully withheld possession of the land from the lord.

      As a general concept, deforcement included the more specific act of disseisin (see adverse possession). It also included ouster, the act by a stranger of forcing a lawful heir from his inherited land. Unlike disseisin and ouster, however, deforcement did not require that the person against whom the land was wrongfully withheld once had possession of the land. Thus, deforcement also embraced the acts of intrusion and abatement, the wrongful entry and occupation by a stranger of vacant land belonging to another.

      The term deforcement has waned in legal significance in modern times, having been replaced in usage by more specific terminology such as adverse possession.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • deforcement — The common law name given to the wrongful possession of land to which another person is rightfully entitled; the detention of dower from a widow. Dictionary from West s Encyclopedia of American Law. 2005. deforcement …   Law dictionary

  • Deforcement — De*force ment, n. [OF.] (Law) (a) A keeping out by force or wrong; a wrongful withholding, as of lands or tenements, to which another has a right. (b) (Scots Law) Resistance to an officer in the execution of law. Burrill. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • deforcement — is where a man wrongfully holds lands to which another person is entitled. It therefore includes disseisin, abatement, discontinuance, and intrusion. But it is applied especially to cases, not falling under those heads, where the person entitled… …   Black's law dictionary

  • deforcement — is where a man wrongfully holds lands to which another person is entitled. It therefore includes disseisin, abatement, discontinuance, and intrusion. But it is applied especially to cases, not falling under those heads, where the person entitled… …   Black's law dictionary

  • deforcement — noun see deforce …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • deforcement — n. illegal withholding of property from its rightful owner; forceful ejection or eviction …   English contemporary dictionary

  • deforcement — de·force·ment …   English syllables

  • deforcement — An abatement, an intrusion, a disseisin, a discontinuance, or any other kind of wrong by which a person who has a right to the freehold is kept out of possession. Sec 3 Bl Comm 172; detention of dower from a widow. 25 Am J2d Dow § 1860 …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • déforcement —  n.m. Action de déforcer …   Le dictionnaire des mots absents des autres dictionnaires

  • deforcement — noun see deforce …   Useful english dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”